Article

1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Inhibits the Differentiation and Migration of TH17 Cells to Protect against Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

Mucosal Immunology Section, Laboratory Science Division, International Vaccine Institute, Seoul, Korea.
PLoS ONE (Impact Factor: 3.53). 12/2010; 5(9):e12925. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0012925
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Vitamin D(3), the most physiologically relevant form of vitamin D, is an essential organic compound that has been shown to have a crucial effect on the immune responses. Vitamin D(3) ameliorates the onset of the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE); however, the direct effect of vitamin D(3) on T cells is largely unknown.
In an in vitro system using cells from mice, the active form of vitamin D(3) (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3)) suppresses both interleukin (IL)-17-producing T cells (T(H)17) and regulatory T cells (Treg) differentiation via a vitamin D receptor signal. The ability of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) to reduce the amount of IL-2 regulates the generation of Treg cells, but not T(H)17 cells. Under T(H)17-polarizing conditions, 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) helps to increase the numbers of IL-10-producing T cells, but 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)'s negative regulation of T(H)17 development is still defined in the IL-10(-/-) T cells. Although the STAT1 signal reciprocally affects the secretion of IL-10 and IL-17, 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) inhibits IL-17 production in STAT1(-/-) T cells. Most interestingly, 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) negatively regulates CCR6 expression which might be essential for T(H)17 cells to enter the central nervous system and initiate EAE.
Our present results in an experimental murine model suggest that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) can directly regulate T cell differentiation and could be applied in preventive and therapeutic strategies for T(H)17-mediated autoimmune diseases.

1 Follower
 · 
198 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The association between vitamin D and multiple sclerosis has (re)-opened new interest in nutrition and natural compounds in the prevention and treatment of this neuroinflammatory disease. The dietary amount and type of fat, probiotics and biologicals, salmon proteoglycans, phytoestrogens and protease inhibitor of soy, sodium chloride and trace elements, and fat soluble vitamins including D, A and E were all considered as disease-modifying nutraceuticals. Studies in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice suggest that poly-unsaturated fatty acids and their 'inflammation-resolving' metabolites and the gut microflora may reduce auto-aggressive immune cells and reduce progression or risk of relapse, and infection with whipworm eggs may positively change the gut-brain communication. Encouraged by the recent interest in multiple sclerosis-nutrition nature's pharmacy has been searched for novel compounds with anti-inflammatory, immune-modifying and antioxidative properties, the most interesting being the scorpion toxins that inhibit specific potassium channels of T cells and antioxidative compounds including the green tea flavonoid epigallocatechin-3-gallate, curcumin and the mustard oil glycoside from e.g. broccoli, sulforaphane. They mostly also inhibit pro-inflammatory signaling through NF-κB or toll-like receptors and stabilize the blood brain barrier. Disease modifying functions may also complement analgesic and anti-spastic effects of cannabis, its constituents, and of 'endocannabinoid enhancing' drugs or nutricals like inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase. Nutricals will not solve multiple sclerosis therapeutic challenges but possibly support pharmacological interventions or unearth novel structures. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    Pharmacology [?] Therapeutics 11/2014; 148. DOI:10.1016/j.pharmthera.2014.11.015 · 7.75 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The ability of the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), to transcriptionally modulate Smads to inhibit Th17 differentiation and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) has not been adequately studied.. This study reports modulation of Smad signaling by the specific binding of the VDR along with its heterodimeric partner RXR to the negative vitamin D response element (VDRE) on the promoter of Smad7, which leads to Smad7 gene repression. The VDR mediated increase in Smad3 expression partially explains the IL10 augmentation seen in Th17 cells. Furthermore, the VDR axis also modulates non-Smad signaling by activating ERK during differentiation of Th17 cells, which inhibits the Th17-specific genes il17a, il17f, il22, and il23r. In vivo EAE experiments revealed that, 1,25(OH)2D3 suppression of EAE correlates with the Smad7 expression in the spleen and lymphnodes. Furthermore, Smad7 expression also correlates well with IL17 and IFNγ expression in CNS infiltered inflammatory T cells. We also observed similar gene repression of Smad7 in in vitro differentiated Th1 cells, when cultured in presence of 1,25(OH)2D3. The above canonical and non-canonical pathways in part address the ability of 1,25(OH)2D3-VDR to inhibit EAE. Copyright © 2015, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 03/2015; DOI:10.1074/jbc.M114.621839 · 4.60 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to an increased risk of a wide range of adverse health outcomes. The active form of vitamin D has an important role in calcium metabolism and in bone mineralisation, but the evidence for other health outcomes is mixed, with the strongest effects seen in the weakest epidemiological study designs. There are plausible pathways whereby vitamin D deficiency can impair immune function, resulting in both overactivity and increased risk of autoimmune disease, as well as immune suppression with poorer resistance to infection. Vitamin D status may influence the bacterial flora that constitute the microbiome and affect immune function through this route. Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet radiation causes the production of a range of chemicals, including vitamin D, and new research is exploring possible vitamin D-independent immunomodulatory pathways.
    01/2014; 6:118. DOI:10.12703/P6-118

Full-text (4 Sources)

Download
94 Downloads
Available from
Jun 3, 2014