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    ABSTRACT: Common variable immunodeficiency disorders (CVIDs) represents a heterogeneous disease spectrum that includes recurrent infections and complications such as autoimmunity, inflammatory organ disease and an increased risk of cancer. A diagnostic delay is common in CVIDs patients. To determine the spectrum of clinical manifestations, immunological characteristics, and the time to diagnosis of 61 adult CVIDs and 18 patients with a partial antibody deficiency (SADNI and IgG subclass deficiency). A retrospective cohort study was performed in patients who met the ESID/PAGID for CVIDs, IgG subclass deficiency and SADNI. Medical records were reviewed to obtain patient demographics, clinical and laboratory data. Infections were the main presentation of all antibody deficient patients and the number of patients with infections declined during IgG therapy. The development of bronchiectasis continued despite IgG therapy, as well as the development of autoinflammatory conditions. Non-infectious disease complications were present in 30% of CVIDs patients at the time of diagnosis and this increased to 51% during follow up despite IgG therapy. The most common complications were autoimmunity or lymphoproliferative disease. The median time to diagnosis was 10 years and in the patients with non-infectious complications the time to diagnosis was considerably longer when compared to the group of patients without complications (17.6 vs. 10.2 years, p = 0.026). In contrast to the partial antibody deficiencies we found a considerable delay in the diagnosis of CVIDs, especially in those patients who were dominated by non-infectious complications, and thus increased awareness would be beneficial. Pulmonary and other complications may continue despite adequate IgG replacement therapy suggesting other causes responsible for these complications.
    Journal of Clinical Immunology 04/2012; 32(5):907-21. · 3.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Subcutaneous IgG treatment for primary immunodeficiencies (PI) is particularly well suited for children because it does not require venous access and is mostly free of systemic adverse events (AEs). In a prospective, open-label, multicenter, single-arm, Phase III study, 18 children and five adolescents with PI were switched from previous intravenous (IVIG) or subcutaneous (SCIG) IgG treatment to receive dose-equivalent, weekly subcutaneous infusions of Hizentra(®) for 40 weeks. Mean IgG trough levels were maintained in patients previously on SCIG, or increased in those previously on IVIG, regardless of age. No serious bacterial infections were reported during the efficacy period of the study. The rates of non-serious infections were 4.77 (children) and 5.18 (adolescents) infections per patient per year. Related AEs were observed in seven children (38.9%) and two adolescents (40%). Three serious AEs and two AEs leading to discontinuation (all unrelated) were reported in children. Hizentra(®) is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for pediatric patients.
    Journal of Clinical Immunology 06/2011; 31(5):752-61. · 3.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A multi-center, prospective, open-label study was conducted in primary immunodeficiency disease patients to determine the tolerability and pharmacokinetics of a 10% liquid IgG preparation administered subcutaneously. Forty-nine subjects (3-77 years old) were enrolled. Pharmacokinetic equivalence of subcutaneous treatment was achieved at a median dose of 137% of the intravenous dose, with a mean trough IgG level of 1,202 mg/dL at the end of the assessment period. The overall infection rate during subcutaneous treatment was 4.1 per subject-year. Three acute serious bacterial infections were reported, resulting in a rate of 0.067 per subject-year. A low overall rate of temporally associated adverse events (8%), and a very low rate of infusion site adverse events (2.8%), was seen at volumes up to 30 mL/site and rates ≤ 30 mL/h/site. Thus, subcutaneous replacement therapy with a 10% IgG preparation proved effective, safe and well-tolerated in our study population of subjects with primary immunodeficiency disease.
    Journal of Clinical Immunology 03/2011; 31(3):323-31. · 3.38 Impact Factor