Article

A β(IV)-spectrin/CaMKII signaling complex is essential for membrane excitability in mice.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa 52242, USA.
The Journal of clinical investigation (Impact Factor: 15.39). 09/2010; 120(10):3508-19. DOI: 10.1172/JCI43621
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Ion channel function is fundamental to the existence of life. In metazoans, the coordinate activities of voltage-gated Na(+) channels underlie cellular excitability and control neuronal communication, cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, and skeletal muscle function. However, despite decades of research and linkage of Na(+) channel dysfunction with arrhythmia, epilepsy, and myotonia, little progress has been made toward understanding the fundamental processes that regulate this family of proteins. Here, we have identified β(IV)-spectrin as a multifunctional regulatory platform for Na(+) channels in mice. We found that β(IV)-spectrin targeted critical structural and regulatory proteins to excitable membranes in the heart and brain. Animal models harboring mutant β(IV)-spectrin alleles displayed aberrant cellular excitability and whole animal physiology. Moreover, we identified a regulatory mechanism for Na(+) channels, via direct phosphorylation by β(IV)-spectrin-targeted calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII). Collectively, our data define an unexpected but indispensable molecular platform that determines membrane excitability in the mouse heart and brain.

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