Article

Gender Wage Discrimination Bias? A Meta-Regression Analysis

The Journal of Human Resources (Impact Factor: 2.37). 01/1998; 33(4):947-973. DOI: 10.2307/146404
Source: RePEc

ABSTRACT This study provides a quantitative review of the empirical literature on gender wage discrimination. Although there is considerable agreement that gender wage discrimination exists, estimates of its magnitude vary widely. Our meta-regression analysis (MRA) reveals that the estimated gender gap has been steadily declining and the wage rate calculation to be crucial. Large biases are likely when researchers omit experience or fail to correct for selection bias. Finally, there appears to be significant gender bias in gender research. However, it is a virtuous variety where researchers tend to compensate for potential bias implicit in their gender membership.

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