Article

Unique equilibrium with single monetary instrument rules

Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department, Working Papers 01/2005;
Source: RePEc

ABSTRACT We consider standard cash-in-advance monetary models and show that there are interest rate or money supply rules such that equilibria are unique. The existence of these single instrument rules depends on whether the economy has an infinite horizon or an arbitrarily large but finite horizon.

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