Article

Comparative Genomics of Gardnerella vaginalis Strains Reveals Substantial Differences in Metabolic and Virulence Potential

Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA.
PLoS ONE (Impact Factor: 3.53). 08/2010; 5(8):e12411. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0012411
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Gardnerella vaginalis is described as a common vaginal bacterial species whose presence correlates strongly with bacterial vaginosis (BV). Here we report the genome sequencing and comparative analyses of three strains of G. vaginalis. Strains 317 (ATCC 14019) and 594 (ATCC 14018) were isolated from the vaginal tracts of women with symptomatic BV, while Strain 409-05 was isolated from a healthy, asymptomatic individual with a Nugent score of 9.
Substantial genomic rearrangement and heterogeneity were observed that appeared to have resulted from both mobile elements and substantial lateral gene transfer. These genomic differences translated to differences in metabolic potential. All strains are equipped with significant virulence potential, including genes encoding the previously described vaginolysin, pili for cytoadhesion, EPS biosynthetic genes for biofilm formation, and antimicrobial resistance systems, We also observed systems promoting multi-drug and lantibiotic extrusion. All G. vaginalis strains possess a large number of genes that may enhance their ability to compete with and exclude other vaginal colonists. These include up to six toxin-antitoxin systems and up to nine additional antitoxins lacking cognate toxins, several of which are clustered within each genome. All strains encode bacteriocidal toxins, including two lysozyme-like toxins produced uniquely by strain 409-05. Interestingly, the BV isolates encode numerous proteins not found in strain 409-05 that likely increase their pathogenic potential. These include enzymes enabling mucin degradation, a trait previously described to strongly correlate with BV, although commonly attributed to non-G. vaginalis species.
Collectively, our results indicate that all three strains are able to thrive in vaginal environments, and therein the BV isolates are capable of occupying a niche that is unique from 409-05. Each strain has significant virulence potential, although genomic and metabolic differences, such as the ability to degrade mucin, indicate that the detection of G. vaginalis in the vaginal tract provides only partial information on the physiological potential of the organism.

0 Followers
 · 
276 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Lactobacillus crispatus is a ubiquitous micro-organism encountered in a wide range of host-associated habitats. It can be recovered from the gastrointestinal tract of animals and it is a common constituent of the vaginal microbiota of humans. Moreover, L. crispatus can contribute to the urogenital health of the host through competitive exclusion and the production of antimicrobial agents. In order to investigate the genetic diversity of this important urogenital species, we performed a comparative genomic analysis of L. crispatus. Utilizing the completed genome sequence of a strain ST1 and the draft genome sequences of nine other L. crispatus isolates, we defined the scale and scope of the pan- and core genomic potential of L. crispatus. Our comparative analysis identified 1,224 and 2,705 ortholog groups present in all or only some of the ten trains, respectively. Based on mathematical modeling, sequencing of additional L. crispatus isolates would result in the identification of new genes and functions, whereas the conserved core of the ten strains was a good representation of the final L. crispatus core genome, estimated to level at about 1,116 ortholog groups. Importantly, the current core was observed to encode bacterial components potentially promoting urogenital health. Using antibody fragments specific for one of the conserved L. crispatus adhesins, we demonstrated that the L. crispatus core proteins have a potential to reduce the ability of Gardnerella. vaginalis to adhere to epithelial cells. These findings thereby suggest that L. crispatus core proteins could protect the vagina from G. vaginalis and bacterial vaginosis. Our pan-genome analysis provides insights into the intraspecific genome variability and the collective molecular mechanisms of the species L. crispatus. Using this approach, we described the differences and similarities between the genomes and identified features likely to be important for urogenital health. Notably, the conserved genetic backbone of L. crispatus accounted for close to 60% of the ortholog groups of an average L. crispatus strain and included factors for the competitive exclusion of G. vaginalis, providing an explanation on how this urogenital species could improve vaginal health.
    BMC Genomics 12/2014; 15(1):1070. DOI:10.1186/1471-2164-15-1070 · 4.04 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We conducted a systematic review of the Medline database (U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, U.S.A) to determine if consistent molecular vaginal microbiota (VMB) composition patterns can be discerned after a decade of molecular testing, and to evaluate demographic, behavioral and clinical determinants of VMB compositions. Studies were eligible when published between 1 January 2008 and 15 November 2013, and if at least one molecular technique (sequencing, PCR, DNA fingerprinting, or DNA hybridization) was used to characterize the VMB. Sixty three eligible studies were identified. These studies have now conclusively shown that lactobacilli-dominated VMB are associated with a healthy vaginal micro-environment and that bacterial vaginosis (BV) is best described as a polybacterial dysbiosis. The extent of dysbiosis correlates well with Nugent score and vaginal pH but not with the other Amsel criteria. Lactobacillus crispatus is more beneficial than L. iners. Longitudinal studies have shown that a L. crispatus-dominated VMB is more likely to shift to a L. iners-dominated or mixed lactobacilli VMB than to full dysbiosis. Data on VMB determinants are scarce and inconsistent, but dysbiosis is consistently associated with HIV, human papillomavirus (HPV), and Trichomonas vaginalis infection. In contrast, vaginal colonization with Candida spp. is more common in women with a lactobacilli-dominated VMB than in women with dysbiosis. Cervicovaginal mucosal immune responses to molecular VMB compositions have not yet been properly characterized. Molecular techniques have now become more affordable, and we make a case for incorporating them into larger epidemiological studies to address knowledge gaps in etiology and pathogenesis of dysbiosis, associations of different dysbiotic states with clinical outcomes, and to evaluate interventions aimed at restoring and maintaining a lactobacilli-dominated VMB.
    PLoS ONE 08/2014; 9(8):e105998. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0105998 · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Gardnerella vaginalis strain JCM 11026(T) was isolated from vaginal tracts of women. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of this organism. Copyright © 2015 Oshima et al.
    Genome Announcements 01/2015; 3(2). DOI:10.1128/genomeA.00286-15

Full-text (2 Sources)

Download
66 Downloads
Available from
May 16, 2014