Article

An international service corps for health--an unconventional prescription for diplomacy.

Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.
New England Journal of Medicine (Impact Factor: 54.42). 09/2010; 363(13):1199-201. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMp1006501
Source: PubMed
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