Article

Long-term absolute risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or worse following human papillomavirus infection: Role of persistence

Department of Viruses, Hormones and Cancer, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
CancerSpectrum Knowledge Environment (Impact Factor: 15.16). 10/2010; 102(19):1478-88. DOI: 10.1093/jnci/djq356
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main cause of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cancer. It has been suggested that information about high-risk HPV type-specific infection might make cervical cancer screening more effective. Persistent HPV infection could also be a useful screening marker. We estimated the long-term risk of high-grade CIN after one-time detection of high-risk HPV DNA and after persistent infection with individual high-risk HPV types.
A cohort of 8656 women from the general population of Denmark was examined twice, 2 years apart (first study examination: May 15, 1991, to January 31, 1993; second study examination: October 1, 1993, to January 31, 1995). The women underwent a gynecological examination and cervical cytology and had swabs taken for HPV DNA analysis by the Hybrid Capture 2 and line probe assays. The women were followed up through the nationwide Danish Pathology Data Bank for cervical neoplasia for up to 13.4 years. The absolute risk of developing cervical lesions before a given time was estimated as a function of time.
For women with normal cytological findings who were concurrently HPV16 DNA positive at the second examination, the estimated probability of developing CIN grade 3 (CIN3) or worse within 12 years of follow-up was 26.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 21.1% to 31.8%). The corresponding risks among those infected with HPV18 was 19.1% (95% CI = 10.4% to 27.3%), with HPV31 was 14.3% (95% CI = 9.1% to 19.4%), and with HPV33 was 14.9% (95% CI = 7.9% to 21.1%). The absolute risk of CIN3 or worse after infection with high-risk HPV types other than HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, or HPV33 was 6.0% (95% CI = 3.8% to 8.3%). The estimated absolute risk for CIN3 or cancer within 12 years of the second examination among women who were HPV16 DNA positive at both examinations was 47.4% (95% CI = 34.9% to 57.5%); by contrast, the risk of CIN3 or worse following a negative Hybrid Capture 2 test was 3.0% (95% CI = 2.5% to 3.5%).
HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, and HPV33 infection and especially HPV16 persistence were associated with high absolute risks for progression to high-grade cervical lesions. The results indicate the potential value of genotyping in cervical cancer screening. Given that HPV DNA-negative women retained their low risk of CIN3 or worse for many years, frequent screening of these women may be unnecessary.

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    • "and approximately 40 types of HPV have been reported to infect the genital tract (Bosch et al., 2002; Munoz et al., 2003). Twelve highrisk HPV types have a causal link with cervical cancer (Bouvard et al., 2009), in particular, HPV 16 and HPV 18 are associated strongly with a higher risk for the progression of cervical cancer (Kjaer et al., 2010). "
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    ABSTRACT: Regional differences in human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and the presence of mixed HPV infections may affect adversely the efficacy of the HPV vaccine. Therefore, a simple and high-throughput HPV genotyping system is required. Recently, a novel HPV genotyping kit (the Mebgen™ HPV kit) was developed. This kit uses multiplex PCR and Luminex xMAP™ technology to detect 13 types of high-risk HPVs and an internal control in a 96-well format. In the present study, the analytical performance of the kit was examined using HPV plasmid DNA. All 13 types of HPVs were detected with a minimum detection sensitivity of 250 copies/test, and highly specific signals were observed. HPV 16 plasmid was detected in samples containing mixtures with other HPV-type plasmids in ratios ranging from 1:1 to 1:1,000. No cross reactivity was observed with DNA from 27 types of other infectious microbes. A clinical evaluation was carried out using cervical samples from 356 patients with persistent abnormal smears diagnosed at mass public health screenings for cervical cancer. The samples were preserved in Tacas™ medium until analysis. HPV was detected in 162 (45.5%) samples including 110 (67.9%) with single infections and 52 (32.1%) with multiple infections. The type distribution of the 13 high-risk HPVs was as follows: 28.4% HPV 16, 11.7% HPV 18, 6.8% HPV 31, 3.1% HPV 33, 3.7% HPV 35, 9.3% HPV 39, 1.9% HPV 45, 8.6% HPV 51, 37.0% HPV 52, 9.3% HPV 56, 16.7% HPV 58, 3.7% HPV 59, and 1.9% HPV 68. To evaluate sample stability over time, changes in the detection of HPV DNA derived from HeLa and SiHa cells were measured in 3 types of liquid-based cytology media. HPV DNA was detected in Tacas and Thinprep™ samples after storage at 4°C or 30°C for 4 weeks and within 1 week of collection in Surepath™ samples. These results suggest that this newly developed HPV genotyping kit is suitable for use in both clinical applications and large-scale epidemiological studies.
    Journal of virological methods 04/2014; 204. DOI:10.1016/j.jviromet.2014.04.010 · 1.88 Impact Factor
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    • "The absolute risk of precancer diagnosis can approach 40% after 3–5 years of persistent HPV 16 infection [15]. Kjaer et al. [16], in a population study, found that HPV 16 persistent infection was associated with high absolute risk for progression to high-grade cervical lesions. HPV infection can be considered productive when the expression of viral gene products remains regulated, not leading to significant host cell changes. "
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose. To describe the acquisition, persistence, and clearance of HPV infection in women with CIN 2 followed up for 12 months. Methods. Thirty-seven women with CIN 2 biopsy, who have proven referral to cervical smear showing low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions or atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance and tested for HPV, were followed up for one year with cervical smear, colposcopy, and HPV test every three months. HPV DNA was detected by the polymerase chain reaction and genotyping by reverse line blot hybridization assay. Results. CIN 2 regression rate was 49% (18/37), persistence as CIN 1 or CIN 2 was 22% (8/37), and progression to CIN 3 was 29% (11/37). Multiple HPV types were observed at admission in 41% (15/37) of cases. HPV 16 was detected at admission in 58% (11/19) of the cases that persisted/progressed and in 39% (7/18) of the cases that regressed. HPV 16 was considered possibly causal in 67% (10/15) of the cases that persisted or progressed and in 10% (1/10) of the cases that regressed (P = 0.01). Conclusion. Multiple HPV infections were frequently detected among women with CIN 2 at admission and during the followup. The CIN 2 associated with HPV 16 was more likely to persist or to progress to CIN 3.
    Obstetrics and Gynecology International 12/2013; 2013:328909. DOI:10.1155/2013/328909
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    • "HPV genotyping has been suggested as a possible alternative option to cytology in triaging HPV-positive women. This approach allows stratifying women to an appropriate management depending on the specific carcinogenic HPV type present and its associated risk for development of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN 3) or cancer (Sherman et al, 2003; Khan et al, 2005; Schiffman et al, 2005; Naucler et al, 2007; Kjaer et al, 2010; Guan et al, 2012). HPV 16 and 18 are the most common types of HPVs found in ICC. "
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    British Journal of Cancer 10/2013; 109(11). DOI:10.1038/bjc.2013.647 · 4.82 Impact Factor
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