Article

Enhancement of proteasome activity by a small-molecule inhibitor of USP14.

Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, 240 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.
Nature (Impact Factor: 42.35). 09/2010; 467(7312):179-84. DOI: 10.1038/nature09299
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Proteasomes, the primary mediators of ubiquitin-protein conjugate degradation, are regulated through complex and poorly understood mechanisms. Here we show that USP14, a proteasome-associated deubiquitinating enzyme, can inhibit the degradation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates both in vitro and in cells. A catalytically inactive variant of USP14 has reduced inhibitory activity, indicating that inhibition is mediated by trimming of the ubiquitin chain on the substrate. A high-throughput screen identified a selective small-molecule inhibitor of the deubiquitinating activity of human USP14. Treatment of cultured cells with this compound enhanced degradation of several proteasome substrates that have been implicated in neurodegenerative disease. USP14 inhibition accelerated the degradation of oxidized proteins and enhanced resistance to oxidative stress. Enhancement of proteasome activity through inhibition of USP14 may offer a strategy to reduce the levels of aberrant proteins in cells under proteotoxic stress.

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