Article

Imaging dynamic cellular events with quantum dots The bright future.

Emory University and Georgia Institute of Technology.
Biochemist 06/2010; 32(3):12.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are tiny light-emitting particles that have emerged as a new class of fluorescent labels for biology and medicine. Compared with traditional fluorescent probes, QDs have unique optical and electronic properties such as size-tuneable light emission, narrow and symmetric emission spectra, and broad absorption spectra that enable the simultaneous excitation of multiple fluorescence colours.

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Available from: Shuming Nie, Feb 17, 2014
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