Article

Adverse Drug Reactions: Part I

Department of Medicine, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, USA.
Southern medical journal (Impact Factor: 1.12). 10/2010; 103(10):1025-8; quiz 1029. DOI: 10.1097/SMJ.0b013e3181f0c866
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Pharmacovigilance is the process of identifying, monitoring, and effectively reducing adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important consideration when assessing a patient's health. The proliferation of new pharmaceuticals means that the incidence of ADRs is increasing. The goal for all health care providers must be to minimize the risk of ADRs as much as possible. Steps to achieve this include understanding the pharmacology for all drugs prescribed and proactively assessing and monitoring those patients at greatest risk for developing an ADR. Groups at greatest risk for developing ADRs include the elderly, children, and pregnant patients, as well as others. Pharmacovigilance must effectively be practiced by all health providers in order to avoid ADRs.

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