Article

Effective intervention or child’s play? A review of video games for diabetes education

Health Administration, School of Allied Health Professions, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298-0203, USA.
Diabetes Technology &amp Therapeutics (Impact Factor: 2.29). 10/2010; 12(10):815-22. DOI: 10.1089/dia.2010.0030
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The purpose of this study is (1) to identify diabetes education video games and pilot studies in the literature, (2) to review themes in diabetes video game design and evaluation, and (3) to evaluate the potential role of educational video games in diabetes self-management education.
Studies were systematically identified for inclusion from Medline, Web of Science, CINAHL, EMBASE, Psychinfo, IEEE Xplore, and ACM Digital Library. Features of each video game intervention were reviewed and coded based on an existing taxonomy of diabetes interventions framework.
Nine studies featuring 11 video games for diabetes care were identified. Video games for diabetes have typically targeted children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and used situation problem-solving methods to teach diet, exercise, self-monitored blood glucose, and medication adherence. Evaluations have shown positive outcomes in knowledge, disease management adherence, and clinical outcomes.
Video games for diabetes education show potential as effective educational interventions. Yet we found that improvements are needed in expanding the target audience, tailoring the intervention, and using theoretical frameworks. In the future, the reach and effectiveness of educational video games for diabetes education could be improved by expanding the target audience beyond juvenile type 1 diabetes mellitus, the use of tailoring, and increased use of theoretical frameworks.

7 Followers
 · 
167 Views
  • Source
    • "In their review, DeShazo et al. studied video game interventions for diabetes type 1, including quizzing, skill training and decision-making on PCs, smart phones and consoles. The authors found positive outcomes in knowledge, disease management adherence and clinical outcome [16] "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Conduct a pilot study on the effect of personalized robot behaviors on the enjoyment of children (8-12) with diabetes and their health knowledge, at the clinic.
    11/2015; 10(3):169-169. DOI:10.1007/s12467-012-0132-x
  • Source
    • "In their review, DeShazo et al. studied video game interventions for diabetes type 1, including quizzing, skill training and decision-making on PCs, smart phones and consoles. The authors found positive outcomes in knowledge, disease management adherence and clinical outcome [16] "
  • Source
    • "Huss (2003) x 1 Jacobson (1990) x 1 Jannink (2008) x 1 Jones (2009) x 1 Kappes and Thompson (1985) x 1 Kemble (2008) x 1 Koch-Mohr (1998) x 1 Kokish (1994) x 1 Kumar (2004) x 1 Lam (2011) x 1 Lanningham-Foster (2006) x x x x x x x x x 9 Lanningham-Foster (2009) x x x x x x 6 Leatherdale (2010) x x 2 Lieberman (1997) x 1 Lieberman (2001) x 1 Maddison (2007) x x x x x x x x x 9 Maddison (2009) x 1 Maddison (2011) x 1 Maddison (2012) x 1 Madsen (2007) x x x x x x x x x 9 Maloney (2008) x x x x x x x 7 Maloney (2012) x 1 McDougall (2008) x x x x 4 McPherson (2006) x 1 Mellecker (2008) x x x x x x x x x 9 Mellecker (2009) x 1 Mellecker (2010) x 1 Mitre (2011) x x 2 Moore (2009) x x x 3 Munguba (2008) x x 2 Murphy (2006) x 1 Murphy (2009) x x x 3 Ni Mhurchu (2008) x x x x x x x x x 9 Owens (2011) x 1 Paez (2009) x x x x 4 Palmeira (2008) x 1 Paw (2008) x x 1 Pempek (2009) x 1 Penko (2010) x x x x 4 Perron (2011) x 1 Resnick (1986) x 1 Ridley (2001) x x x 3 Roemmich (2012) x 1 Rosenbloom (1999) x 1 Rubin (1986) x 1 Rubin (2010) x 1 Seigel (2008) x 1 Shames (2004) x 1 Shih (2011a) g x 1 Shih (2011b) h x 1 (continued) Table A1. (Continued) Study [first author (publication year)] Barnett et al. 32 (2011) Biddiss and Irwin 27 (2010) Ceranoglu 35 (2010) Daley 26 (2009) DeShazo et al. 36 (2010) "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Effective, evidence-based, and interesting methods are needed for children's health promotion. Digital games can be such a method, but there is need for a summary of the evidence on the effectiveness of digital games in promoting children's health. The aim of this review of reviews was to evaluate the quality of systematic reviews, to summarize the evidence in systematic reviews and reviews related to the effectiveness of digital games in children's health promotion, and to identify gaps in knowledge. A systematic literature search was conducted in May–August 2013 from relevant databases, and 1178 references were found. In total, 15 systematic reviews and reviews met the inclusion criteria. Most of the systematic reviews were found to be medium quality on the AMSTAR checklist. Most commonly, systematic reviews and reviews evaluated active videogames. According to the results, evidence of the highest level and quality seems to support an increase in physical activity to light to moderate levels and energy expenditure, especially when playing active videogames that require both upper and lower body movements. In addition, sedentary games were shown to have potential in children's health education, especially in supporting changes in asthma- and diabetes-related behavior and in dietary habits. However, there are still several gaps in the knowledge. There is a need for further high-quality systematic reviews and research in the field of health games.
    06/2014; 3(3):145. DOI:10.1089/g4h.2013.0086
Show more