Article

Functional Diversity of ESC-Derived Motor Neuron Subtypes Revealed through Intraspinal Transplantation

Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Neurology, and Neuroscience, Center for Motor Neuron Biology and Disease, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA.
Cell stem cell (Impact Factor: 22.15). 09/2010; 7(3):355-66. DOI: 10.1016/j.stem.2010.07.013
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Cultured ESCs can form different classes of neurons, but whether these neurons can acquire specialized subtype features typical of neurons in vivo remains unclear. We show here that mouse ESCs can be directed to form highly specific motor neuron subtypes in the absence of added factors, through a differentiation program that relies on endogenous Wnts, FGFs, and Hh-mimicking the normal program of motor neuron subtype differentiation. Molecular markers that characterize motor neuron subtypes anticipate the functional properties of these neurons in vivo: ESC-derived motor neurons grafted isochronically into chick spinal cord settle in appropriate columnar domains and select axonal trajectories with a fidelity that matches that of their in vivo generated counterparts. ESC-derived motor neurons can therefore be programmed in a predictive manner to acquire molecular and functional properties that characterize one of the many dozens of specialized motor neuron subtypes that exist in vivo.

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