Article

Transcriptome profiling in neurodegenerative disease.

School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
Journal of neuroscience methods (Impact Factor: 2.3). 11/2010; 193(2):189-202. DOI: 10.1016/j.jneumeth.2010.08.018
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Changes in gene expression and splicing patterns (that occur prior to the onset and during the progression of complex diseases) have become a major focus of neurodegenerative disease research. These signature patterns of gene expression provide clues about the mechanisms involved in the molecular pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disease and may facilitate the discovery of novel therapeutic drugs. With the development of array technologies and the very recent RNA-seq technique, our understanding of the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disease is expanding exponentially. Here, we review the technologies involved in gene expression and splicing analysis and the related literature on three common neurodegenerative diseases: Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease.

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