Article

The central region of spiral galaxies as seen by Herschel. M81, M99 and M100

05/2010; DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/201014588
Source: arXiv

ABSTRACT With appropriate spatial resolution, images of spiral galaxies in thermal infrared (~10 micron and beyond) often reveal a bright central component, distinct from the stellar bulge, superimposed on a disk with prominent spiral arms. ISO and Spitzer studies have shown that much of the scatter in the mid-infrared colors of spiral galaxies is related to changes in the relative importance of these two components, rather than to other modifications, such as the morphological type or star formation rate, that affect the properties of the galaxy as a whole. With the Herschel imaging capability from 70 to 500 micron, we revisit this two-component approach at longer wavelengths, to see if it still provides a working description of the brightness distribution of galaxies, and to determine its implications on the interpretation of global far-infrared properties of galaxies. Comment: 5 pages, 2 figures, accepted for the A&A Herschel Special Issue

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