ATG12 Conjugation to ATG3 Regulates Mitochondrial Homeostasis and Cell Death

Department of Pathology and Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
Cell (Impact Factor: 32.24). 08/2010; 142(4):590-600. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2010.07.018
Source: PubMed


ATG12, an ubiquitin-like modifier required for macroautophagy, has a single known conjugation target, another autophagy regulator called ATG5. Here, we identify ATG3 as a substrate for ATG12 conjugation. ATG3 is the E2-like enzyme necessary for ATG8/LC3 lipidation during autophagy. ATG12-ATG3 complex formation requires ATG7 as the E1 enzyme and ATG3 autocatalytic activity as the E2, resulting in the covalent linkage of ATG12 onto a single lysine on ATG3. Surprisingly, disrupting ATG12 conjugation to ATG3 does not affect starvation-induced autophagy. Rather, the lack of ATG12-ATG3 complex formation produces an expansion in mitochondrial mass and inhibits cell death mediated by mitochondrial pathways. Overall, these results unveil a role for ATG12-ATG3 in mitochondrial homeostasis and implicate the ATG12 conjugation system in cellular functions distinct from the early steps of autophagosome formation.

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Available from: Srirupa Roy, Oct 05, 2015
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    • "This protection was found to correlate with increased expression of the antiapoptotic protein BCL-XL. Further, BCL-XL inhibitors were able to induce a similar level of apoptosis in cells expressing either wild-type ATG3 or mutant ATG3 incapable of ATG12-ATG3 complex formation [53]. "
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