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Reply to “Concerns about Recently Identified Widespread Antisense Transcription in Escherichia coli”

Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York, USA.
mBio (Impact Factor: 6.88). 06/2010; 1(2). DOI: 10.1128/mBio.00119-10
Source: PubMed
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    ABSTRACT: Several studies have shown that promoters of protein-coding genes are origins of pervasive non-coding RNA transcription and can initiate transcription in both directions. However, only recently have researchers begun to elucidate the functional implications of this bidirectionality and non-coding RNA production. Increasing evidence indicates that non-coding transcription at promoters influences the expression of protein-coding genes, revealing a new layer of transcriptional regulation. This regulation acts at multiple levels, from modifying local chromatin to enabling regional signal spreading and more distal regulation. Moreover, the bidirectional activity of a promoter is regulated at multiple points during transcription, giving rise to diverse types of transcripts.
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