Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 in Infantile Colic: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

Department of Pediatrics, Regina Margherita Children Hospital, University of Turin, Piazza Polonia, 94 10126 Turin, Italy.
PEDIATRICS (Impact Factor: 5.47). 09/2010; 126(3):e526-33. DOI: 10.1542/peds.2010-0433
Source: PubMed


To test the efficacy of Lactobacillus reuteri on infantile colic and to evaluate its relationship to the gut microbiota.
Fifty exclusively breastfed colicky infants, diagnosed according to modified Wessel's criteria, were randomly assigned to receive either L reuteri DSM 17 938 (10(8) colony-forming units) or placebo daily for 21 days. Parental questionnaires monitored daily crying time and adverse effects. Stool samples were collected for microbiologic analysis.
Forty-six infants (L reuteri group: 25; placebo group: 21) completed the trial. Daily crying times in minutes/day (median [interquartile range]) were 370 (120) vs 300 (150) (P=.127) on day 0 and 35.0 (85) vs 90.0 (148) (P=.022) on day 21, in the L reuteri and placebo groups, respectively. Responders (50% reduction in crying time from baseline) were significantly higher in the L reuteri group versus placebo group on days 7 (20 vs 8; P=.006), 14 (24 vs 13; P=.007), and 21 (24 vs 15; P=.036). During the study, there was a significant increase in fecal lactobacilli (P=.002) and a reduction in fecal Escherichia coli and ammonia in the L reuteri group only (P=.001). There were no differences in weight gain, stooling frequency, or incidence of constipation or regurgitation between groups, and no adverse events related to the supplementation were observed.
L. reuteri DSM 17 938 at a dose of 10(8) colony-forming units per day in early breastfed infants improved symptoms of infantile colic and was well tolerated and safe. Gut microbiota changes induced by the probiotic could be involved in the observed clinical improvement.

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    • "Several clinical trials have shown diverse findings regarding DSM as an effective treatment to inhibit the symptoms of infantile colic (Savino et al., 2010; Szajewska et al., 2013; Sung et al., 2014). Since there is evidence that dichotomizing axons from T4-L1 DRG neurons innervate both the stomach and small intestine (Zhong et al., 2008) and because it is less invasive, we tested DSM's effects on the pseudoaffective responses to GDin vivo to supplement our ex vivo electrophysiological data (Results). "
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    ABSTRACT: Certain bacteria exert visceral antinociceptive activity, but the mechanisms involved are not determined. Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 was examined since it may be antinociceptive in children. Since transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel activity may mediate nociceptive signals, we hypothesized that TRPV1 current is inhibited by DSM. We tested this by examining the effect of DSM on the firing frequency of spinal nerve fibres in murine jejunal mesenteric nerve bundles following serosal application of capsaicin. We also measured the effects of DSM on capsaicin-evoked increase in intracellular Ca2+ or ionic current in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Furthermore, we tested the in vivo antinociceptive effects of oral DSM on gastric distension in rats. Live DSM reduced the response of capsaicin- and distension-evoked firing of spinal nerve action potentials (238 ± 27.5% vs. 129 ± 17%). DSM also reduced the capsaicin-evoked TRPV1 ionic current in DRG neuronal primary culture from 83 ± 11% to 41 ± 8% of the initial response to capsaicin only. Another lactobacillus (Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1) with known visceral anti-nociceptive activity did not have these effects. DSM also inhibited capsaicin-evoked Ca2+ increase in DRG neurons; an increase in Ca2+ fluorescence intensity ratio of 2.36 ± 0.31 evoked by capsaicin was reduced to 1.25 ± 0.04. DSM releasable products (conditioned medium) mimicked DSM inhibition of capsaicin-evoked excitability. The TRPV1 antagonist 6-iodonordihydrocapsaicin or the use of TRPV1 knock-out mice revealed that TRPV1 channels mediate about 80% of the inhibitory effect of DSM on mesenteric nerve response to high intensity gut distension. Finally, feeding with DSM inhibited perception in rats of painful gastric distension. Our results identify a specific target channel for a probiotic with potential therapeutic properties. Journal compilation
    The Journal of Physiology 06/2015; 593(17). DOI:10.1113/JP270229 · 5.04 Impact Factor
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    • "The microbiota of colicky infants also presents lower amounts of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli, which are known to be anti-inflammatory and to exert various healthy properties [19] [20] [21]. The intake of probiotic Lactobacilli during the first months of life can contribute to containing colic [22] [23]. On the contrary, in vivo studies utilizing probiotic Bifidobacteria for the treatment of colic are lacking. "
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    ABSTRACT: Infant colic is a common gastrointestinal disorder of newborns, mostly related to imbalances in the composition of gut microbiota and particularly to the presence of gas-producing coliforms and to lower levels of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli. Probiotics could help to contain this disturbance, with formulations consisting of Lactobacillus strains being the most utilized. In this work, the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium breve B632 that was specifically selected for its ability to inhibit gas-producing coliforms, was challenged against the Enterobacteriaceae within continuous cultures of microbiota from a 2-month-old colicky infant. As confirmed by RAPD-PCR fingerprinting, B. breve B632 persisted in probiotic-supplemented microbiota cultures, accounting for the 64% of Bifidobacteria at the steady state. The probiotic succeeded in inhibiting coliforms, since FISH and qPCR revealed that the amount of Enterobacteriaceae after 18 h of cultivation was 0.42 and 0.44 magnitude orders lower in probiotic-supplemented microbiota cultures than in the control ones. These results support the possibility to move to another level of study, that is, the administration of B. breve B632 to a cohort of colicky newborns, in order to observe the behavior of this strain in vivo and to validate its effect in colic treatment.
    BioMed Research International 08/2014; 2014. DOI:10.1155/2014/301053 · 2.71 Impact Factor
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    • "Their laxative and abdominal pain-relieving effects are similar to those of magnesium oxide [11]. Additionally, probiotics alleviate colic, one of the symptoms of severe constipation [12]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Aim. The objective was to evaluate the synergistic effects of fermented rice extracts (FRe) on the laxative and probiotic properties of yoghurt in rats with loperamide-induced constipation. Methods. After constipation induction, yoghurt containing FRe (BFRe; 0.05%, 0.1%, or 1%) was administered orally once per day for 6 days. Results. Loperamide treatment caused marked decreases in fecal pellet numbers and water content discharged, as well as in the surface mucosal thickness of the colonic lumen, intestinal charcoal transit ratio, thickness, and number of mucous-producing goblet cells in the colonic mucosa, whereas it increased the remnant fecal pellet number and the mean diameter of the colonic lumen. However, this loperamide-induced constipation was ameliorated by treatment with FRe, yoghurt single formula, or 0.05%, 0.1%, or 1% BFRe (10 mL/kg). Additionally, the viable numbers of Lactobacillus in the cecal contents and feces were markedly higher than those in constipated rats. Moreover, greater probiotic and laxative effects were detected in BFRe-treated rats than in rats treated with equivalent doses of yoghurt or FRe single formula. Conclusion. The results suggest that addition of FRe to liquid yoghurt will enhance the probiotic and beneficial laxative effects of yoghurt in the digestive tract, without causing side effects.
    Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine 08/2014; 2014:878503. DOI:10.1155/2014/878503 · 1.88 Impact Factor
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