Article

Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

SUN-Dipartimento di Discipline Odontostomatologiche, Ortodontiche e Chirurgiche, Università degli Studi di Foggia, Foggia, Italy.
Medicina oral, patologia oral y cirugia bucal (Impact Factor: 1.1). 03/2011; 16(2):e139-43.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Candida albicans is a dimorphic yeast strongly gram positive able to live as normal commensal organism in the oral cavity of healthy people. It is the yeast more frequently isolated in the oral cavity. Under local and systemic factors related to the host conditions, it becomes virulent and responsible of oral diseases known as oral candidiasis. It has been shown that the presence of denture is a predisposing factor to the onset of pathologies related to C. albicans. Clinical studies have shown that C. albicans is not only able to adhere to the mucous surfaces, but also to stick to the acrylic resins of the dental prostheses. Both the plaque accumulated on the denture and the poor oral hygiene contribute to the virulence of Candida, offering the clinical picture of Candida-associated denture stomatitis. The therapeutic strategies currently adopted in the clinical practice to overcome these fungal infections provide for the use of topical and/or systemic antifungal and topical antiseptics and disinfectants, the irradiation with microwaves and the accurate mechanical removal of the bacterial plaque from the denture surfaces and from the underlying mucosa. A correct oral hygiene is important for the control of the bacterial biofilm present on the denture and on the oral mucosa and it is the fundamental base for the prophylaxis and the therapy of the Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

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