Article

International Myeloma Working Group Consensus Statement Regarding the Current Status of Allogeneic Stem-Cell Transplantation for Multiple Myeloma

University of Washington Seattle, Seattle, Washington, United States
Journal of Clinical Oncology (Impact Factor: 17.88). 10/2010; 28(29):4521-30. DOI: 10.1200/JCO.2010.29.7929
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To define consensus statement regarding allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (Allo-SCT) as a treatment option for multiple myeloma (MM) on behalf of International Myeloma Working Group.
In this review, results from prospective and retrospective studies of Allo-SCT in MM are summarized.
Although the introduction of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) has lowered the high treatment-related mortality associated with myeloablative conditioning, convincing evidence is lacking that Allo-RIC improves the survival compared with autologous stem-cell transplantation.
New strategies are necessary to make Allo-SCT safer and more effective for patients with MM. Until this is achieved, Allo-RIC in myeloma should only be recommended in the context of clinical trials.

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