Epithelial-Myoepithelial Carcinoma With High Grade Transformation

Department of Pathology, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
The American journal of surgical pathology (Impact Factor: 5.15). 09/2010; 34(9):1258-65. DOI: 10.1097/PAS.0b013e3181e366d2
Source: PubMed


Epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma (EMC) is a rare salivary gland tumor of presumed intercalated duct origin with a low risk of metastasis and mortality. Factors shown to affect behavior include positive margins, vascular invasion, necrosis, and myoepithelial anaplasia. The latter category and dedifferentiated EMCs have been separated on the basis of presumed myoepithelial versus ductal origin, respectively. Three additional cases of typical EMC with transition to high-grade carcinoma are presented. Two of the tumors were stained with CAM5.2, 34betaE12, cytokeratin 14, p63, S100, calponin, smooth muscle actin, and muscle-specific actin. All tumors showed a gradual transition to a high-grade carcinoma from an EMC, each composed of clear cells even in the high-grade regions. One case also showed a discrete area with ductal lumina and another had plasmacytoid morphology. Squamous differentiation was seen in all cases as well. A consistent immunostaining pattern was not noted. Areas with focal lumina were diffusely positive for CAM5.2 only. Areas with clear cells showed patchy S100 positivity only, whereas cytokeratin 14 and 34betaE12-stained squamous pearls. The case with plasmacytoid morphology was diffusely positive for p63. No immunoexpression was noted with smooth muscle actin, muscle-specific actin, or calponin. It was not possible to convincingly separate the high-grade component in these cases into ductal dedifferentiated EMC versus myoepithelial. Recently, there has been a move to abandon the term "dedifferentiation" in favor of "high-grade transformation" in other salivary gland malignancies. We report these 3 such cases, review the literature and propose that these lesions be regarded as "EMC with high-grade transformation."

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    • "The phenomenon is also known as high grade transformation. It is common in sarcomas and salivary gland carcinoma, like as liposarcoma, chondrosarcoma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberance, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma9,10. But, it is sometimes observed in many neoplasms. "
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    ABSTRACT: Eccrine porocarcinoma is a rare malignant tumor. Immunostain for S-100 protein, in addition to epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), is described to be useful in the diagnosis. Herein, we report a case of eccrine porocarcinoma with immunostain for S-100 protein which was useful in diagnoses of recurrent and metastatic lesions. The primary lesion in the left inguinal region was excised, but it recurred on the same site 14 months after the resection. The recurrent lesion showed epithelioid melanocytic findings. Three months later, metastasis to the lungs was found. Since these recurrent and metastatic lesions were dedifferentiated, typical histologic findings of eccrine porocarcinoma disappeared in biopsied specimens. Nevertheless, scattered immunoreactive cells for S-100 protein were maintained in these dedifferentiated lesions. S-100 protein positive cells could be an aid to diagnose, even if histologic findings of recurrent and metastatic lesions have changed by dedifferentiation.
    Annals of Dermatology 08/2013; 25(3):348-51. DOI:10.5021/ad.2013.25.3.348 · 1.39 Impact Factor
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    • "A literature review revealed that a total of 22 such cases have been reported [28–42]. The average age of the patients (72 years) is higher than that of conventional EMC patients (60 years) [36]. Similar to conventional EMC, HGT-EMC most often involves the parotid gland followed by the submandibular gland. "
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    ABSTRACT: "Dedifferentiation" and/or high-grade transformation (HGT) has been described in a variety of salivary gland carcinomas, including acinic cell carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma, polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma, myoepithelial carcinoma, low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma and hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma, although the phenomenon is a rare event. Recent authors tend to preferably use the term HGT instead of "dedifferentiation" in these cases. HGT-tumors are composed of conventional carcinomas juxtaposed with areas of HG morphology, usually either poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma or "undifferentiated" carcinoma, in which the original line of differentiation is no longer evident. The HG component is generally composed of solid nests, sometimes occurring in cribriform pattern of anaplastic cells with large vesicular pleomorphic nuclei, prominent nucleoli and abundant cytoplasm. Frequent mitoses and extensive necrosis is evident. The Ki-67 labeling index is consistently higher in the HG component. p53 abnormalities have been demonstrated in the transformed component in a few examples, but the frequency varies by the histologic type. HER-2/neu overexpression and/or gene amplification is considerably exceptional. The molecular-genetic mechanisms responsible for the pathway of HGT in salivary gland carcinomas largely still remain to be elucidated. Salivary gland carcinomas with HGT have been shown to be more aggressive than conventional carcinomas with a poorer prognosis, accompanied by higher local recurrence rate and propensity for cervical lymph node metastasis, suggesting the need for wider resection and neck dissection.
    Head and Neck Pathology 07/2013; 7(Suppl 1). DOI:10.1007/s12105-013-0458-8
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    • "The females are affected in 60% of the cases [1] [3] [5] [7] [8]. Disagreeing regarding this tendency of female gender involvement, this and some other reports affected male patients [7] "
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    ABSTRACT: Epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma was first described by Danath et al. in 1972 and is classified as a rare low-grade biphasic neoplasm of the salivary glands. This case report presents a male patient who had a lesion in the oral mucosa with a history of recurrence of the tumor. The outcome resulted in a profile consistent with an epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma with a high degree of transformation. The case highlights the importance of histopathological evaluation of oral lesions, which occasionally may not present typical clinical aspects of malignant lesion.
    The Open Dentistry Journal 07/2012; 6:111-7. DOI:10.2174/1874210601206010111
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Bayardo Perez-Ordoñez