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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The association between socioeconomic status (SES) and cancer survival has been studied extensively in adults. However, little is known about this relationship in the pediatric population, specifically in jurisdictions with universal health care insurance programs. Our aim was to determine whether lower SES is associated with poorer survival in pediatric Hodgkin (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients in Ontario. PROCEDURE: All incident cases of HL and NHL in children between 0 and 14 years old diagnosed in Ontario between January 1st, 1985 and December 31st, 2006 were identified through the Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario Networked Information System. Neighborhood income quintile and material deprivation quintile at diagnosis were used as proxies for SES. Cox proportional hazards regressions were used to assess the association between SES and the risk of event-free or overall survival. RESULTS: A total of 692 patients were included in the analysis: 302 HL and 390 NHL. SES was not associated with survival (overall or event-free) among HL and NHL patients (P > 0.05 for all four comparisons, i.e., HL/NHL, EFS/OS) after adjustment for age, sex, period of diagnosis, and disease stage. There were no differences in the distribution of disease stage across SES strata at the time of diagnosis. Similarly, the distribution of deaths among long-term survivors (survived ≥5 years from diagnosis) did not differ across SES strata (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: SES was not associated with risk of death among pediatric HL and NHL patients in Ontario. This was consistent through the cancer trajectory, including diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship. Pediatr Blood Cancer © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Pediatric Blood & Cancer 07/2013; 60(7):1171-1177. DOI:10.1002/pbc.24386 · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cancer is one of the most common causes of death among young individuals. The purpose of this study was to explore the risk of early death (the first five years after diagnosis) among children (0-14 years), adolescents (15-19 years), and young adults (20-24 years) with cancer in Norway, born during 1965-1985. The overall and cancer-specific early deaths were explored by linking population-based national registers (including the Cancer Registry of Norway and the Cause of Death Registry) that include the entire population of Norway (approximately 1.3 million individuals). Hazard and sub-hazard ratios were estimated using Cox regression analyses and competing risk models. A total of 5,828 individuals were diagnosed with cancer (56.3 % males). During follow-up, 1,415 individuals died from cancer (60.2 % males) within five years after diagnosis. The hazard ratio (HR) of overall death of the cancer patients relative to the general population decreased from 1965 (from HR, 385.8 (95 % confidence interval (CI): 335.3, 443.4) in 1965-74 to HR, 19.7 (CI: 9.3, 41.5) in 2005-09). Over all, there were fewer cancer-related deaths among female compared with male patients (sub-hazard ratio (SHR), 0.83 (CI: 0.74, 0.92)). Except for all hematopoietic malignancies, adolescents and young adult patients had lower risk of cancer death than children. The difference in risk of cancer and overall deaths between the cancer patients and the general population has been substantially reduced since 1965.
    Cancer Causes and Control 06/2012; 23(8):1297-305. DOI:10.1007/s10552-012-0007-x · 2.96 Impact Factor