Article

The Institute of Medicine's Redesigning Continuing Education in the Health Professions

Villanova University College of Nursing, Villanova, PA 19805, USA.
The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing (Impact Factor: 0.6). 08/2010; 41(8):340-1. DOI: 10.3928/00220124-20100726-02
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Redesigning Continuing Education in the Health Professions was published in the spring by the Institute of Medicine. The authors, an ad hoc committee, identified current issues in continuing education for health professionals. This column briefly summarizes major topics addressed in the report.

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