Article

Correlates of Mucosal Immunity and Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Girls

Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Department of Psychology, Brock University, Ontario, Canada.
Journal of pediatric endocrinology & metabolism: JPEM (Impact Factor: 0.71). 06/2010; 23(6):579-87. DOI: 10.1515/jpem.2010.096
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT In this study we examined whether salivary hormones, physical activity and adiposity were correlated with secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) and frequency of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) in 43 early-pubertal and 59 late-pubertal girls. Physical activity was measured using accelerometers and relative body fat was assessed using bioelectrical impendence. Resting saliva samples were obtained between 1500 and 1800 hr and assayed for sIgA, cortisol and testosterone. Participants completed a one-month health log to record URTI frequency. Early-pubertal girls were more physically active, had less adiposity, but lower concentrations of sIgA than late-pubertal adolescents (122.7 +/- 91.6 vs 201.9 +/- 102.9 pg/ml, respectively). The frequency of URTI was similar in the two groups. Neither sIgA nor URTI were correlated with salivary hormones, physical activity or adiposity within the early-pubertal girls. In the late-pubertal group, sIgA was negatively associated (r = -0.44; p < 0.05) with cortisol, and positively associated (r = 0.41; p < 0.05) with the testosterone to cortisol ratio. These results suggest that mucosal immunity increases with pubertal maturation, while higher cortisol is associated with lower mucosal immunity in adolescents.

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    • "The parents and/or participants were asked to return the health log once completed. The total number of days per week with URTI symptoms was then tallied for each participant, with days being counted only if two or more consecutive days of cold or flu symptoms were reported [17] [18]. "
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