Article

Development and pilot testing of a culturally sensitive multimedia program to improve breast cancer screening in Latina women

Division of General Internal Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, USA.
Patient Education and Counseling (Impact Factor: 2.6). 07/2011; 84(1):128-31. DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2010.05.014
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Our study goal was to assess the effects of a brief patient video on breast cancer knowledge and attitudes among Latina women at a community health center.
We conducted pre- and post-testing of knowledge and attitudes in women aged 40 years or older with active screening referrals (n=91). We compared pre- and post-test knowledge and attitudes overall and by baseline values.
Mean knowledge increased from 5.8/10 to 6.9/10 (p<0.05), with the greatest increases in those with low baseline knowledge (p<.001). There were no changes in mean attitudes, which were high at baseline (3.8/5); however, among the 16 women with negative/neutral attitudes, 50% developed positive attitudes after watching the video (p<0.05). Baseline intention to complete screening was high at 98%.
Although the overall effects were modest, the greatest improvements were in those with low baseline knowledge scores and negative/neutral baseline attitudes. Future testing should examine the effects in a community-based sample.
A brief patient video has promise for influencing patient knowledge and perhaps attitudes while being amenable to integration into clinical flow.

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