Article

Outcomes of an Illness Self-Management Group Using Wellness Recovery Action Planning

University of Kansas-Social Welfare, Lawrence, KS 66045, USA.
Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal (Impact Factor: 1.16). 06/2010; 34(1):57-60. DOI: 10.2975/34.1.2010.57.60
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The aim of this preliminary study was to examine the impact of participation in an illness self-management recovery program (Wellness Recovery Action Planning-WRAP) on the ability of individuals with severe mental illnesses to achieve key recovery related outcomes.
A total of 30 participants from three mental health centers were followed immediately before and after engaging in a 12-week WRAP program.
Three paired sample t-tests were conducted to determine the effectiveness of WRAP on hope, recovery orientation, and level of symptoms. A significant positive time effect was found for hope and recovery orientation. Participants showed improvement in symptoms, but the change was slightly below statistical significance.
These preliminary results offer promising evidence that the use of WRAP has a positive effect on self-reported hope and recovery-related attitudes, thereby providing an effective complement to current mental health treatment.

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