Article

Cytosolic FoxO1: alive and killing.

Nature Cell Biology (Impact Factor: 20.06). 07/2010; 12(7):642-3. DOI: 10.1038/ncb0710-642
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Tumour suppressors of the Forkhead box O (FoxO) family are proposed to limit tumour growth through direct transcriptional regulation. Cytosolic FoxO1 can also suppress tumour growth by triggering autophagy and ultimately cell death in a transcription-independent manner.

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