Article

Optical trapping of micrometer-sized dielectric particles by cylindrical vector beams

Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Japan.
Optics Express (Impact Factor: 3.49). 05/2010; 18(10):10828-33. DOI: 10.1364/OE.18.010828
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Single-beam optical trapping of micrometer-sized dielectric particles is experimentally demonstrated using radially and azimuthally polarized beams. The axial and transverse optical trapping efficiencies of glass and polystyrene beads suspended in water are measured. The radially polarized beam exhibited the highest trapping efficiency in the axial direction due to the p polarization of the radial polarization on the particle surface. On the other hand, the azimuthally polarized beam had a higher transverse trapping efficiency than the radially polarized beam. These results are consistent with numerical predictions.

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    • "Vector beams have received significant interest [13] [14], due in great part to their ability to produce stronger longitudinal field components [15] [16], and smaller spot sizes [17], as compared to scalar light beams, upon focusing by high numerical aperture objectives. Also, when using vector beams for optical trapping, it is possible to improve the axial and transverse stiffness of the optical trap via radial and azimuthal polarization, respectively [18] [19] [20]. Most recently, vector beams have been used for optical communication [21]. "
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    ABSTRACT: We experimentally measured the self-healing of the spatially inhomogeneous states of polarization of vector Bessel beams. Radially and azimuthally polarized vector Bessel beams were experimentally generated via a digital version of Durnin's method, using a spatial light modulator in concert with a liquid crystal q-plate. As a proof of principle, their intensities and spatially inhomogeneous states of polarization were experimentally measured using Stokes polarimetry as they propagated through two disparate obstructions. It was found, similar to their intensities, that their spatially inhomogeneous states of polarization self-healed. The self-healing can be understood via geometric optics, i.e., the interference of the unobstructed conical rays in the shadow region of the obstruction, and may have applications in, for example, optical trapping.
    Journal of optics 03/2015; 17(3). DOI:10.1088/2040-8978/17/3/035617 · 2.01 Impact Factor
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    • "Vector beams have received significant interest [13] [14], due in great part to their ability to produce stronger longitudinal field components [15] [16], and smaller spot sizes [17], as compared to scalar light beams, upon focusing by high numerical aperture objectives . Also, when using vector beams for optical trapping, it is possible to improve the axial and transverse stiffness of the optical trap via radial and azimuthal polarization, respectively [18] [19] [20]. Most recently, vector beams have been used for optical communication [21]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We experimentally measured the self-healing of the spatially inhomogeneous states of polarization of radial and azimuthal polarized vector Bessel beams. Radial and azimuthal polarized vector Bessel beams were generated via a digital version of Durnin's method, using a spatial light modulator in concert with a liquid crystal $q$-plate. As a proof of principle, their intensities and spatially inhomogeneous states of polarization were measured using Stokes polarimetry as they propagated through two disparate obstructions. It was found, similar to their intensities, the spatially inhomogeneous states of polarization of a radial and azimuthal polarized vector Bessel beams self-heal. Similar to scalar Bessel beams, the self-healing of vector Bessel beams can be understood via geometric optics, i.e., the interference of the unobstructed conical rays in the shadow region of the obstruction. The self-healing of vector Bessel beams may have applications in, for example, optical trapping.
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    • "Vector beams make possible the determination of the dipole moment orientation of a single molecule [3] [4]. These fields are also effective for the sharp focusing needed for laser micromanipulation [5] [6] [7]. "
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    ABSTRACT: We propose a new scheme based on a modified Mach–Zehnder interferometer for generating vector beams. The beams are formed with the help of a special diffractive optical element, which performs the astigmatic transformation of an input Hermite–Gaussian beam into two complexly conjugated Laguerre–Gaussian beams. The scheme allows us to obtain radially and azimuthally polarized beams and beams with a more complex polarization structure. A theoretical estimation for the transformation of beams both of radial and azimuthal polarization has been fulfilled.
    Journal of optics 04/2013; 15(4). DOI:10.1088/2040-8978/15/4/044029 · 2.01 Impact Factor
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