Article

Who is exposed to smoke at home? A population-based cross-sectional survey in central Vietnam.

Tobacco control (Impact Factor: 3.85). 08/2010; 19(4):344-5. DOI:10.1136/tc.2009.032227
Source: PubMed
0 0
 · 
0 Bookmarks
 · 
90 Views
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To identify and evaluate the options for population level government policies to increase the prevalence of homes free of secondhand smoke. The literature was searched for population level policy options and evidence on them. Three criteria were used to evaluate the policy options: effectiveness, the reductions on inequalities in secondhand smoke exposure, and cost effectiveness. The setting was four developed, English speaking jurisdictions: Britain, USA, Australia, and New Zealand. Evidence from all four countries shows some association between relatively comprehensive tobacco control programmes and lower prevalence levels of smoking in homes. The evidence of the effect of such programmes on inequalities in smokefree home prevalence is limited. No published evidence was found of the cost effectiveness of the programmes in achieving changes in smokefree homes. Within comprehensive programmes, there is some indirect evidence that some mass media campaigns could increase the prevalence of smokefree homes. Structural options that have potential to support smokefree homes include smokefree places legislation, and laws for the protection of children. The available evidence to date suggests that comprehensive tobacco control programmes (to reduce the prevalence of smoking in the total population) are likely to be the most effective and sustainable option for increasing the prevalence of smokefree homes.
    Journal of Epidemiology &amp Community Health 05/2006; 60(4):298-304. · 3.39 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The association between environmental tobacco smoking (ETS) and childhood pneumonia has not been established in developed or developing countries. A study was conducted to assess the effect and impact of ETS exposure on pneumonia among children in central Vietnam. A population-based large-scale cross-sectional survey was conducted covering all residents of 33 communes in Khanh Hoa Province, the central part of Vietnam. Information on demographics, socioeconomic status and house environment, including smoking status of each household member, was collected from householders. Hospital admissions for pneumonia among children aged <5 years in each household in the previous 12 months were recorded based on caregiver's report. A total of 353 525 individuals living in 75 828 households were identified in the study areas. Of these, 24 781 (7.0%) were aged <5 years. The prevalence of ETS was 70.5% and the period prevalence of hospital admissions for pneumonia was 2.6%. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that exposure to ETS was independently associated with hospital admissions for pneumonia (adjusted odds ratio 1.55, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.92). The prevalence of tobacco smoking was higher among men than women (51.5% vs 1.5%). It is estimated that 28.7% of childhood pneumonia in this community is attributable to ETS. Children in Vietnam are exposed to substantial levels of ETS which results in 44 000 excess hospital admissions due to pneumonia each year among children aged <5 years.
    Thorax 02/2009; 64(6):484-9. · 8.38 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Children's exposure to other people's cigarette smoke (environmental tobacco smoke, or ETS) is associated with a range of adverse health outcomes for children. Parental smoking is a common source of children's exposure to ETS. Preventing exposure to cigarette smoke in infancy and childhood has significant potential to improve children's health worldwide. To determine the effectiveness of interventions aiming to reduce exposure of children to ETS. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group trials register and conducted additional searches of two health and education databases not included in this specialised register. Date of the most recent search: October 2007. Interventions tested using controlled trials with or without random allocation were included in this review if the interventions addressed participants (parents and other family members, child care workers and teachers) involved with the care and education of infants and young children (aged 0-12 years). All mechanisms for reduction of children's environmental tobacco smoke exposure, and smoking prevention, cessation, and control programmes were included. These include smoke-free policies and legislation, health promotion, social-behavioural therapies, technology, education and clinical interventions. Two authors independently assessed studies and extracted data. Due to heterogeneity of methodologies and outcomes, no summary measures were possible and results were synthesised using narrative summaries. Thirty-six studies met the inclusion criteria. Four interventions were targeted at populations or community settings, 16 studies were conducted in the 'well child' healthcare setting and 13 in the 'ill child' healthcare setting. Two further studies conducted in paediatric clinics do not make clear whether the visits are to well or ill children, and another includes both well and ill child visits. Nineteen of these studies are from North America and 12 in other high income countries. Five studies are from low- or middle-income countries. In 17 of the 36 studies there was reduction of ETS exposure for children in both intervention and comparison groups. In only 11 of the 36 studies was there a statistically significant intervention effect. Four of these successful studies employed intensive counselling interventions targeted to smoking parents. We found little evidence of difference in effectiveness of interventions between the well infant, child respiratory illness and other child illness settings as contexts for parental smoking cessation interventions. One successful intervention was in the school setting, targeting the ETS exposure of children from smoking fathers. While brief counselling interventions have been identified as successful ifor adults when delivered by physicians, this cannot be extrapolated to adults as parents in child health settings. However, there is limited support for more intensive counselling interventions for parents in such contexts. There is no clear evidence of differences between the respiratory, non-respiratory ill child, well child and peripartum settings as contexts for reduction of children's ETS exposure.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 02/2008; · 5.70 Impact Factor

Full-text (3 Sources)

View
19 Downloads
Available from
May 8, 2013