Article

Cortisol, interleukins and S100B in delirium in the elderly.

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Brain and Cognition (Impact Factor: 2.68). 10/2010; 74(1):18-23. DOI: 10.1016/j.bandc.2010.05.010
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT In independent studies delirium was associated with higher levels of cortisol, interleukin(IL)s, and S100B. The aim of this study was to simultaneously compare cortisol, IL-6, IL-8, and S100B levels in patients aged 65years and older admitted for hip fracture surgery with and without delirium. Cortisol, IL-6, IL-8, and S100B were assayed in repeated blood samples. 120 patients (mean age 84years, 62 patients with delirium) were included. Highest levels of IL-8 (27.1, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 13.6-53.1pg/ml) and cortisol (666, 95% CI: 475-859nmol/L) were before delirium, but of IL-6 (84.3, 95% CI: 46.5-151.4pg/mL) and S100B (0.18, 95% CI: 0.12-0.24 microg/L) during delirium. In multivariable analysis cortisol, LogIL-6, and LogS100B were significantly associated with delirium, but adjusted for pre-existing cognitive impairment, only LogS100B remained significantly associated. Cortisol, IL-6 and S100B may have a role in the pathogenesis of delirium, but S100B is the strongest independent marker.

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