Article

Current practice patterns in primary hip and knee arthroplasty among members of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons.

Department of Orthopedics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.
The Journal of arthroplasty (Impact Factor: 1.79). 09/2010; 25(6 Suppl):2-4. DOI: 10.1016/j.arth.2010.04.033
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT A poll was conducted at the 2009 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons to determine current practices among its members in primary total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. This article summarizes the audience responses to a number of multiple choice questions concerning perioperative management and operative practice patterns and preferences including anesthetic choices, blood management, surgical approaches, implant selection, implant fixation, bearing surface choice, postoperative rehabilitation, recommended postoperative activity restrictions, and antibiotic prophylaxis.

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