Article

[Biofeedback for headaches].

Institut für Medizinische Psychologie und Medizinische Soziologie, Medizinische Fakultät der Universität Rostock, Rostock, Deutschland.
Der Schmerz (Impact Factor: 1.5). 06/2010; 24(3):279-88; quiz 89. DOI: 10.1007/s00482-010-0892-4
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Biofeedback is a direct feedback of a physiological function. The aim of biofeedback is to change the physiological function into a required direction. To manage this, the physiological function has to be fed back visually or acoustically and it has to be perceived consciously. Biofeedback as a therapeutic practice derives from behavioural therapy and can be used in the context of behavioural interventions. Biofeedback has proved to be successful in non-medical treatment of pain. According to more recent meta-analyses biofeedback reveals high evidence in the treatment of migraine or tension-type headache. In these headaches biofeedback procedures are considered highly effective.

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