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Late Adolescent and Young Adult Outcomes of Girls Diagnosed With ADHD in Childhood: An Exploratory Investigation

Center for Children and Families, State University of New York at Buffalo, 106 Diefendorf Hall, 3435 Main Street, Building 20, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA.
Journal of Attention Disorders (Impact Factor: 2.4). 04/2011; 15(3):204-14. DOI: 10.1177/1087054710361586
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To characterize the late adolescent and young adult outcomes of girls diagnosed with ADHD in childhood.
The study included 58 women from a larger longitudinal study of ADHD. A total of 34 (M = 19.97 years old) met DSM criteria for ADHD in childhood, whereas the remaining 24 (M = 19.83 years old) did not. Self- and parent-reports of psychopathology, delinquency, interpersonal relationships, academic achievement, job performance, and substance use were collected.
The findings suggest that girls with ADHD experience difficulties in late adolescence and young adulthood, such as more conflict with their mothers, being involved in fewer romantic relationships, and experiencing more depressive symptoms than comparison women. However, differences did not emerge in all domains, such as job performance, substance use, and self-reported ADHD symptomatology.
The findings of this study add to the literature on the negative late adolescent and young adult outcomes associated with childhood ADHD in women.

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    • "In late adolescence and young adulthood , girls with ADHD are involved in fewer romantic relationships (Babinski et al. 2010), and when they are involved in relationships, they exhibit ''underdeveloped interpersonal sensitivity skills and awareness of relationship dynamics'' (Waite 2007; p. 185). Compared to those without ADHD, men and women with ADHD report being less satisfied in their romantic relationships as well as discord in such relationships (e.g., Babinski et al. 2010; Barkley et al. 2008), including intimate partner violence (Wymbs et al. 2012, in press). Finally, when married, individuals with ADHD are more likely to divorce than individuals without ADHD (e.g., Biederman et al. 2006; Fargason and Ford 1994; Kessler et al. 2006; Murphy and Barkley 1996). "
    Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review 08/2015; · 4.75 Impact Factor
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    • "In late adolescence and young adulthood , girls with ADHD are involved in fewer romantic relationships (Babinski et al. 2010), and when they are involved in relationships, they exhibit ''underdeveloped interpersonal sensitivity skills and awareness of relationship dynamics'' (Waite 2007; p. 185). Compared to those without ADHD, men and women with ADHD report being less satisfied in their romantic relationships as well as discord in such relationships (e.g., Babinski et al. 2010; Barkley et al. 2008), including intimate partner violence (Wymbs et al. 2012, in press). Finally, when married, individuals with ADHD are more likely to divorce than individuals without ADHD (e.g., Biederman et al. 2006; Fargason and Ford 1994; Kessler et al. 2006; Murphy and Barkley 1996). "
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    • "In addition, women with childhood ADHD are at high risk for developing comorbidities, such as externalizing problems (e.g., conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder; Hinshaw et al. 2012) and internalizing problems (e.g., depression , anxiety, and low self-esteem; Babinski et al. 2011; Hinshaw et al. 2012; Magdol et al. 1997), which may function as 'stepping stones' for subsequent IPV risk. In a longitudinal, representative birth cohort study, Moffitt and Caspi (1999) found that for females, the strongest predictor of physical victimization by an intimate partner was the females' own aggressive delinquency (e.g., hit a parent, fought in public, used a weapon in a fight). "
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