Article

Preoperative endoscopic tattooing of pancreatic body and tail lesions decreases operative time for laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy

Department of Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA.
Surgery (Impact Factor: 3.11). 08/2010; 148(2):371-7. DOI: 10.1016/j.surg.2010.04.008
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Precise and expedient localization of small pancreatic tumors during laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy can be difficult owing to the decreased tactile ability of laparoscopy and the homogenous appearance of the surrounding retroperitoneal fat. Precise localization of the lesion is critical to achieving adequate margins of resection while preserving as much healthy pancreas as possible. The objective in this study was to determine the effect of endoscopic tattooing of the distal pancreas on operative time.
We reviewed retrospectively 36 consecutive patients who had a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy at our institution over a 4-year period (2006-2009). Ten patients underwent preoperative tattooing via an endoscopic transgastric technique using ultrasound guidance. The tattoo was performed using 2-4 cc of sterile purified carbon particles injected immediately proximal and anterior to the pancreatic lesion. Operative times were compared according to the presence of a tattoo.
The endoscopically placed tattoo was easily visible upon entering the lesser sac in all 10 patients at laparoscopy. Patients with a tattoo had a shorter operative time (median, 128.5 minutes; range, 53-180) compared with patients without a tattoo (median, 180 minutes; range, 120-240; P < .01). None of the tattoo group required repeat surgery, whereas 1 patient who was not tattooed required re-resection for a lesion missed in the initial specimen. There were no complications associated with the endoscopic ultrasound-guided tattoo.
Endoscopic ultrasound-guided tattooing of pancreas lesions before a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy is safe and is associated with decreased operative time compared with nontattooed patients. This technique can allow for quick and precise localization of the lesion, allowing for optimal preservation of pancreas parenchyma and demarcating an appropriate line of resection.

0 Followers
 · 
89 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs) are rare and account for only 2%-4% of all pancreatic neoplasms. All PNENs are potential (neurendocrine tumors PNETs) or overt (neuroendocrine carcinomas PNECs) malignant, but a subset of PNETs is low-risk. Even in case of low-risk PNETs surgical resection is frequently required to treat hormone-related symptoms and to obtain an appropriate pathological diagnosis. Low-risk PNETs in the body and the tail are ideal for minimally-invasive approaches which should be tailored to the individual patient. Generally, surgeons must aim for parenchyma sparing in these cases. In high-risk and malignant PNENs, indications for tumor resection are much wider than for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, in many cases due to the relatively benign tumor biology. Thus, patients with locally advanced and metastatic PNETs may benefit from extensive resection. In experienced hands, even multi-organ resections are accomplished with acceptable perioperative morbidity and mortality rates and are associated with excellent long term survival. However, poorly differentiated neoplasms with high proliferation rates are associated with a dismal prognosis and may frequently only be treated with chemotherapy. The evidence on surgical treatment of PNENs stems from reviews of mostly single-center series and some analyses of nation-wide tumor registries. No randomized trial has been performed to compare surgical and non-surgical therapies in potentially resectable PNEN. Though such a trial would principally be desirable, ethical considerations and the heterogeneity of PNENs preclude realization of such a study. In the current review, we summarize recent advances in the surgical treatment of PNENs.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are relatively rare tumors comprising 1-2% of all pancreas neoplasms. In the last 10 years our understanding of this disease has increased dramatically allowing for advancements in the treatment of pNETs. Surgical excision remains the primary therapy for localized tumors and only potential for cure. New surgical techniques using laparoscopic approaches to complex pancreatic resections are a major advancement in surgical therapy and increasingly possible. With early detection being less common, most patients present with metastatic disease. Management of these patients requires multidisciplinary care combining the best of surgery, chemotherapy and other targeted therapies. In addition to surgical advances, recently, there have been significant advances in systemic therapy and targeted molecular therapy.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although insulinomas are rare, they are the most common pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, with an incidence of four cases per million population. Insulinomas are generally benign indolent intrapancreatic tumors. Surgical resection remains the main option for treatment. However, up to 67% of a pancreatic head insulinomas are nonpalpable, thus surgical resection of the nonplapable insulinoma in this area could become problematic resulting in prolonged surgical time, increased risk of pancreatic duct injury and need for pancreaticoduodenectomy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine- needle tattooing (EUS-FNT), has been shown to have a crucial role for localization of pancreatic body and tail lesions, facilitating laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy and helping surgeons identify the location of the tumor. EUS-FNT might have a role for preoperative localization of pancreatic head insulinomas which are likely to be nonpalpable. We report a case of preoperative EUS-FNT for localization of a nonplapable pancreatic head insulinoma. This report demonstrates that EUS-FNT of pancreatic head insulinomas may facilitate surgical resection, reduce operative time and decrease surgical complications.