Article

Determinants of alcohol consumption in HIV-uninfected injection drug users

Department of Epidemiology, The Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.
Drug and alcohol dependence (Impact Factor: 3.28). 09/2010; 111(1-2):173-6. DOI: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2010.04.004
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We assess the association between time fixed and time varying participant characteristics and subsequent alcohol consumption in 1968 injection drug users (median age 37 years, 28% female, 90% African-American) followed semi-annually from 1988 to 2008. Median alcohol consumption was seven drinks per week at study entry (first and third quartile: 1, 26) with 36% reporting binge drinking. Alcohol consumption and binge drinking decreased over follow-up. Older individuals and women reported consuming fewer drinks per week. Higher typical alcohol consumption was reported by those participants who reported in the prior 6 months: non-injection cocaine use, injection drug use, having one or more sex partners, or among men, a same sex partner. Associations were generally similar for drinks per week and binge drinking. This study demonstrates that in a large urban cohort of persons with a history of injection drug use, risky drug use and sexual risk behavior are associated with subsequent alcohol consumption.

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