Article

Live optical projection tomography.

EMBL-CRG Systems Biology Program; Centre for Genomic Regulation; UPF; Barcelona, Spain; Istituciô Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats; Barcelona, Spain.
Organogenesis (Impact Factor: 2.6). 10/2009; 5(4):211-6. DOI: 10.4161/org.5.4.10426
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a technology ideally suited for imaging embryonic organs. We emphasize here recent successes in translating this potential into the field of live imaging. Live OPT (also known as 4D OPT, or time-lapse OPT) is already in position to accumulate good quantitative data on the developmental dynamics of organogenesis, a prerequisite for building realistic computer models and tackling new biological problems. Yet, live OPT is being further developed by merging state-of-the-art mouse embryo culture with the OPT system. We discuss the technological challenges that this entails and the prospects for expansion of this molecular imaging technique into a wider range of applications.

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