Characteristics and Outcomes of Work-Related Open Globe Injuries

Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, 243 Charles St., Boston, MA 02114, USA.
American Journal of Ophthalmology (Impact Factor: 3.87). 08/2010; 150(2):265-269.e2. DOI: 10.1016/j.ajo.2010.02.015
Source: PubMed


To evaluate the characteristics and outcomes of patients treated for open globe injuries sustained at work and to compare these results to patients injured outside of work.
Retrospective chart review of 812 consecutive patients with open globe injuries treated at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary between 1999 and 2008.
A total of 146 patients with open globe injuries sustained at work were identified and their characteristics and outcomes were compared with the rest of the patients in the database.
Of the patients injured at work, 98% were men, and the average age of the patients was 35.8 years (17-72 years). The most common mechanism of injury was penetrating trauma (56%); 38 patients examined had intraocular foreign bodies (IOFB). Nine work-related open globe injuries resulted in enucleation. There was a higher incidence of IOFBs (P = .0001) and penetrating injuries (P = .0005) in patients injured at work. Both the preoperative (P = .0001) and final best-corrected visual acuity (P = .0001) was better in the work-related group. The final visual acuity was better than 20/200 in 74.1% of cases of work-related open globe injuries. However, there was no difference observed in the rate of enucleations (P = .4).
Work-related injuries can cause significant morbidity in a young population of patients. Based on average patient follow-up and final visual acuity, those injured at work do at least as well as, if not potentially better than, those with open globe injuries sustained outside of work. While the statistically higher rate of IOFB in the work population is not surprising, it does emphasize the importance of strict adherence to the use of eye protection in the workplace.

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Available from: Michael T Andreoli, May 02, 2014
    • "Findings of the present study were similar to the literature data- foreign bodies, burns, radiation and eyeball penetration/laceration accounted for the majority of WREI. On the contrary, in a study by Kanoff et al., penetrating injuries and intraocular foreign bodies ranked the highest among occupational open globe injuries.[8] Chang et al., studied on hospitalized eye injuries and demonstrated that open-globe injuries and contusion injuries were the most common in the wards.[10] "
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To analyze descriptive data and characteristics of work-related eye injuries (WREI) admitted into the emergency department (ED) and obtain information to utilize in planning measures to prevent WREI. Materials and Methods: This prospective study recruited patients with WREI admitted to the center in the two-year study period. Only the casualties occurred at the workplace and while working constituted the sample. The data were collected via face-to-face contact in the ED. Results: Males comprised the majority of the sample (95.3%, n = 778) and mean age of the patients was 28.1 ± 6.5 (range: 15-54) with the biggest percentage in between 25 and 34 years of age (46.2%, n = 377). Most patients were working in the metal and machinery sectors (66.4%, n = 542). Nearly half of the patients had less than 1 year of experience (50.4%, n = 411). The most common mechanism of WREI was noted to be exposures to welding light (26.9%, n = 219), followed by drilling/cutting injuries (21.1%, n = 172). “Carelessness” and “hurrying up” were the most commonly reported causes of WREIs among ‘worker-related causes’ (21.4% and 16.1%, respectively). Lack of protective measures ranked the highest among workplace-related causes (18.7%, n = 207). Conclusions: Programs to increase awareness on workplace safety and sound preventive strategies for both parties-employers and employees are to be pursued. Occupational safety efforts should include training on workplace eye safety and campaigns to raise knowledgeability on this disease among workers.
    Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 09/2013; 61(9):497-501. DOI:10.4103/0301-4738.119435 · 0.90 Impact Factor
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    • "Trauma can destroy the normal structure of the eyeball directly; as a result, ocular physiology function may also be affected. In the United States, eye injuries cost >$300 million per year due to lost productivity, medical expenses, and workers’ compensation.2 In China, ocular trauma is the primary cause of unilateral blindness. "
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    ABSTRACT: Background Ocular trauma is a major cause of vision loss, especially in the young patients, and is the leading cause of unilateral blind in China.Objective The aims of this report are to analyze ciliary and choroidal lesion characteristics and outcomes of a group of patients with ruptured globe injuries and discuss finding a more effective treatment protocol. Here we report our experience treating ruptured globe injuries.Methods Seventy-five patients (75 eyes) with a diagnosis of ruptured globe injuries were selected from 264 patients with open globe injuries at the Shierming Eye Hospital of Shandong Province between January 2009 and December 2011. General information and clinical characteristics such as ciliary and choroidal lesion features were reviewed.ResultsOf the 75 patients, 85.3% were men, and the average age of the patients was 37.2 years (range, 6–63 years). The right eye was injured in 52.0%; enucleation was performed in 9 patients. There was no light perception, in the final corrected visual acuity in another 3 patients. The ratio of better visual acuity (better than 0.1) increased from 0 preoperatively to 16.0% postoperatively. Among the 75 patients with ruptured globe injuries, 13 had ciliary injury and 47 (62.7%) had choroidal injuries. Both ciliary and choroidal injuries were detected in 15 patients. Retinal tissue incarceration during sclera suturing was usually the vital point leading to unfavorable results.Conclusions Ruptured globe injury usually results in severe visual acuity damage. Active treatment could help to restore visual acuity in patients to some degree. Some effective treatment protocols for ruptured globe injuries could be followed. Some unsuitable procedures in primary treatment should be avoided to achieve a better prognosis.
    Current Therapeutic Research 06/2013; 74:16–21. DOI:10.1016/j.curtheres.2012.10.002 · 0.45 Impact Factor
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    • "The most common open-globe injuries were anterior penetrating injuries and were associated with good visual prognosis, whereas open injuries that involved the posterior globe often accompanied retinal detachment, severe vitreous hemorrhage or endophthalmitis which are associated with poor prognoses. These findings are consistent with other studies [47], [49]–[51]. We analyzed the OTS distribution in the two types of globe injuries. "
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    ABSTRACT: The burden and pattern of ocular trauma in China are poorly known and not well studied. We aimed at studying the epidemiological characteristics of patients hospitalized for ocular trauma at major ophthalmology departments in the largest industrial base of plastic toys in China. A retrospective study of ocular trauma cases admitted to 3 tertiary hospitals in China from 1st January 2001 to 31st December 2010 was performed. The study included a total of 3,644 injured eyes from 3,559 patients over the 10-year period: 2,008 (55.1%) open-globe injuries, 1,580 (43.4%) closed-globe injuries, 41 (1.1%) chemical injuries, 15 (0.4%) thermal injuries and 678 (18.6%) ocular adnexal injuries. The mean age of the patients was 29.0±16.8 years with a male-to-female ratio of 5.2∶1 (P = 0.007). The most frequent types of injury were work-related injuries (1,656, 46.5%) and home-related injuries (715, 20.1%). The majority of injuries in males (56.2%) and females (36.0%) occurred in the 15-44 age group and 0-14 age group, respectively. The final visual acuity correlated with the initial visual acuity (Spearman's correlation coefficient = 0.659; P<0.001). The Ocular Trauma Score also correlated with the final visual acuity (Spearman's correlation coefficient = 0.655; P<0.001). This analysis provides an epidemiological study of patients who were hospitalized for ocular trauma. Preventive efforts are important for both work-related and home-related eye injuries.
    PLoS ONE 10/2012; 7(10):e48377. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0048377 · 3.23 Impact Factor
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