Article

Increasing incidence of dementia in the oldest old: evidence and implications.

Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, 600 South Paulina Street, Room 1038, Chicago, IL 60612, USA, Department of Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA. .
Alzheimer's Research and Therapy (Impact Factor: 4.39). 05/2010; 2(3):9. DOI: 10.1186/alzrt32
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The oldest old are the fastest growing segment of the US population but accurate estimates of the incidence of dementia in this age group have been elusive. Corrada and colleagues present data on the 5-year age-specific rates of dementia incidence in persons 90 years and older from The 90+ Study. Their findings show a continued exponential increase in dementia incidence after age 90 that mirrors the increase observed in persons aged 65 to 90, with a doubling every 5.5 years. This contrasts with previous smaller studies reporting a slowing of the increase in incidence after age 90. If confirmed, the continued increase, rather than a plateau, in the incidence of dementia in the oldest old has implications for proper healthcare planning. Strategies for prevention and treatment will require more information regarding risk factors and the etiopathogenesis of dementia in the oldest old.

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