Article

Comparison of food allergy prevalence among Chinese infants in Chongqing, 2009 versus 1999

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Primary Child Care, Children's Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Yuzhong District, Chongqing, China.
Pediatrics International (Impact Factor: 0.73). 10/2010; 52(5):820-4. DOI: 10.1111/j.1442-200X.2010.03166.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Food allergy prevalence is increasing in developed countries, but these results have not yet been verified in developing countries, especially in China. Our aim was to determine whether the prevalence and characteristics of food allergy have changed over the last 10 years in Chongqing, China.
Two cross-sectional studies were performed, 10 years apart (1999 and 2009) using the same diagnostic methods in the same age group (0-24 months) of the same clinic in Chongqing, China. A total of 401 infants were randomly selected for the present study. Food allergy was confirmed by food challenge. spss 15.0 was used to analyze the difference in prevalence.
Food allergy prevalence increased significantly from 3.5% in 1999 to 7.7% in 2009 (P= 0.017). The prevalence of a positive skin-prick-test response was also increased (from 9.9% to 18%; P= 0.002). Egg and cow's milk were still the most common food allergens, which cause skin and gastrointestinal symptoms in most infants.
This is the first study in China to indicate time trends in food allergy prevalence and characteristics. Our data show that in the 10-year period from 1999 to 2009, the prevalence of food allergy seems to have increased in China.

0 Followers
 · 
74 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Food allergies have increased in prevalence over the past 20 years, now becoming an important public health concern. Although there are no therapies currently available for routine clinical care, recent reports indicate that immunotherapies targeting the mucosal immune system may be effective. Oral immunotherapy is conducted by administering small, increasing amounts of food allergen; it has shown promise for desensitizing individuals with peanut, egg, or milk allergies. Sublingual immunotherapy also desensitizes allergic patients to foods-2 major studies have examined the effects of sublingual immunotherapy in subjects with peanut allergies. We review the complex nature of IgE-mediated food allergies and the therapies being evaluated in clinical trials. We focus on the diagnosis and management of food allergies, and investigational therapies. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Gastroenterology 01/2015; DOI:10.1053/j.gastro.2015.01.034 · 13.93 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This review focuses on advances and updates in the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of food allergy over the past 3 years since our last comprehensive review. On the basis of numerous studies, food allergy likely affects nearly 5% of adults and 8% of children, with growing evidence of an increase in prevalence. Potentially rectifiable risk factors include vitamin D insufficiency, unhealthful dietary fat, obesity, increased hygiene, and the timing of exposure to foods, but genetics and other lifestyle issues play a role as well. Interesting clinical insights into pathogenesis include discoveries regarding gene-environment interactions and an increasing understanding of the role of nonoral sensitizing exposures causing food allergy, such as delayed allergic reactions to carbohydrate moieties in mammalian meats caused by sensitization from homologous substances transferred during tick bites. Component-resolved diagnosis is being rapidly incorporated into clinical use, and sophisticated diagnostic tests that indicate severity and prognosis are on the horizon. Current management relies heavily on avoidance and emergency preparedness, and recent studies, guidelines, and resources provide insight into improving the safety and well-being of patients and their families. Incorporation of extensively heated (heat-denatured) forms of milk and egg into the diets of children who tolerate these foods, rather than strict avoidance, represents a significant shift in clinical approach. Recommendations about the prevention of food allergy and atopic disease through diet have changed radically, with rescinding of many recommendations about extensive and prolonged allergen avoidance. Numerous therapies have reached clinical trials, with some showing promise to dramatically alter treatment. Ongoing studies will elucidate improved prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.
    The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology 12/2013; 133(2). DOI:10.1016/j.jaci.2013.11.020 · 11.25 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There is limited epidemiological evidence of food hypersensitivity (FH) in the adult population. We aimed to determine the prevalence of FH in Mexican adults, their clinical features and to establish common food involved in its appearance.
    Allergy, asthma & immunology research 11/2014; 6(6):511-6. DOI:10.4168/aair.2014.6.6.511 · 3.08 Impact Factor