Sexual risk behaviours and HIV-1 prevalence among urban men who have sex with men in Cape Town, South Africa

Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, University of Cape Town, Cape Town 7705, South Africa.
Sexual Health (Impact Factor: 1.37). 06/2010; 7(2):149-53. DOI: 10.1071/SH09090
Source: PubMed


Distinct homosexual and heterosexual HIV epidemics have previously been recognised in South Africa. However, linked HIV prevalence and self-reported sexual risk behaviour data have not been reported for men who have sex with men (MSM) in Cape Town since 1986.
We conducted a cross-sectional, anonymous, venue-based HIV risk behaviour and prevalence study of 542 self-identified MSM in greater Cape Town using a self-administered risk questionnaire and the OraSure testing device to asses HIV-1 prevalence.
This sample had an overall HIV prevalence of 10.4% (56/539). We found that self-identifying as gay, homosexual or queer (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 4.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-20.0) and reporting ever having had a sexually transmissible infection diagnosis (AOR 4.3, 95% CI: 2.3-8.3) were significantly predictive of testing HIV-1 positive, while reporting unprotected anal intercourse with a known HIV-negative partner (AOR 0.4, 95% CI: 0.2-0.9) was significantly protective.
These data suggest a mature epidemic with consistent high-risk taking among MSM in Cape Town, and significant associations of select self-reported risk behaviours and HIV-1 serostatus. There is a need for continued and robust HIV surveillance along with detailed risk behaviour trends over time to inform the development of targeted risk-reduction interventions for this population.

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    • "What is significant however is that these findings confirm same-sex sexual behavior exists among these young rural men, whatever form it may take and that these young men also have sex with female partners. What these and the other findings cannot do however is give adequate insight into the extent to which this population practices exclusive MSM behavior, bisexuality or bisexual concurrency, all of which are important to answer our overarching question [7, 12, 13, 26]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Research into HIV and men who have sex with men's (MSM) health in South Africa has been largely confined to the metropolitan centres. Only two studies were located making reference to MSM in rural contexts or same-sex behaviors among men in the same. There is growing recognition in South Africa that MSM are not only disproportionately affected by HIV and have been underserved by the country's national response, but that they contribute significantly to sustaining the high number of new infections recorded each year. We argue that to meet the objectives of the country's national strategic plan for HIV, STI and TB it is important we know how these behaviours may be contributing to the sustained rural HIV epidemic in the youngest age groups and determine what constitutes appropriate and feasible programmatic response that can be implemented in the country's public sector health services.
    AIDS and Behavior 11/2012; 17(Suppl 1). DOI:10.1007/s10461-012-0356-1 · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    • "Studies with MSM in Africa continue to report that very few participants self-identify as transgender (cf. Baral et al. 2009; Burrell et al. 2010). Apart from the possibility that transgender individuals do not participate in research, and are 'inaccessible', this could also be attributed to the way in which researchers ask about gender identity and/or design their research. "
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    ABSTRACT: Transgender people are an important key population for HIV risk globally, and several studies have found HIV prevalence rates in transgender populations that are significantly higher than those among other key populations such as men who have sex with men (MSM). There is a lack of research on transgender populations in Africa, and at present, there is almost no data available on HIV prevalence and risk among transgender people on the continent. It is possible that the invisibility of transgender people in epidemiological data from Africa is related to the criminalisation of same-sex behaviour in many countries and the subsequent fear of negative repercussions from participation in research. Alternatively, transgender people may be being overlooked in research due to confusion among researchers about how to ask questions about gender identity. It is also possible that transgender populations have simply been ignored in research to date. Without research on transgender-specific HIV prevalence and risk, it is very difficult to know what interventions and services are needed for this risk population. Therefore, it is important that researchers, governments, Non Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and donor organisations begin to pay explicit attention to transgender people in their HIV-related research and programmes in Africa.
    SAHARA J: journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance / SAHARA , Human Sciences Research Council 09/2012; 9(3):160-3. DOI:10.1080/17290376.2012.743829 · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    • "The estimates of HIV prevalence observed here were significantly higher than a recent HIV prevalence study of MSM in urban Cape Town [11]. In that study, HIV prevalence was found to be 10.6% (n = 57/538) as compared to 25.5% (n = 51/200) observed in this study (p < 0.05) (23). "
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    ABSTRACT: The HIV epidemic in Sub Saharan Africa has been traditionally assumed to be driven by high risk heterosexual and vertical transmission. However, there is an increasing body of data highlighting the disproportionate burden of HIV infection among MSM in the generalized HIV epidemics across of Southern Africa. In South Africa specifically, there has been an increase in attention focused on the risk status and preventive needs of MSM both in urban centers and peri-urban townships. The study presented here represents the first evaluation of HIV prevalence and associations of HIV infection among MSM in the peri-urban townships of Cape Town. The study consisted of an anonymous probe of 200 men, reporting ever having had sex with another man, recruited through venue-base sampling from January to February, 2009. Overall, HIV prevalence was 25.5% (n = 51/200). Of these prevalent HIV infections, only 6% of HIV-1 infected MSM were aware of their HIV status (3/50). 0% of men reported always having safe sex as defined by always wearing condoms during sex and using water-based lubricants. Independent associations with HIV infection included inconsistent condom use with male partners (aOR 2.3, 95% CI 1.0-5.4), having been blackmailed (aOR 4.4, 95% CI 1.6-20.2), age over 26 years (aOR 4.2, 95% CI 1.6-10.6), being unemployed (aOR 3.7, 95% CI 1.5-9.3), and rural origin (aOR 6.0, 95% CI 2.2-16.7). Bisexual activity was reported by 17.1% (34/199), and a total of 8% (16/200) reported having a regular female partner. Human rights violations were common with 10.5% (n = 21/200) reporting having been blackmailed and 21.0% (n = 42/200) reporting being afraid to seek health care. The conclusions from this study include that a there is a high risk and underserved population of MSM in the townships surrounding Cape Town. The high HIV prevalence and high risk sexual practices suggest that prevalence will continue to increase among these men in the context of an otherwise slowing epidemic. These data further highlight the need to better characterize risk factors for HIV prevention and appropriate targeted combination packages of HIV interventions including biomedical, behavioural, and structural approaches to mitigate HIV risk among these men.
    BMC Public Health 10/2011; 11(1):766. DOI:10.1186/1471-2458-11-766 · 2.26 Impact Factor
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