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    ABSTRACT: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) affects an estimated 33 million people worldwide. Progression of the disease to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is associated with compromised nutrition status and increased caloric needs. As the infection attacks and weakens the immune system, secondary opportunistic infections and malignancies often occur, which further compromise nutritional status and nutrient provision. One such condition is Kaposi sarcoma, an opportunistic malignancy examined in this case study. The patient, a young transgender male-to-female diagnosed with AIDS, presented with nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain in November 2010. A gastric mass was discovered after an esophagogastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) was preformed and a subsequent biopsy diagnosed the patient with gastric Kaposi sarcoma. The position of the mass, coupled with the nutritional issues inherent with an AIDS diagnosis, complicated the provision of adequate nutrition with the patient. The medical nutrition therapy (MNT) included distal enteral nutrition, total parenteral nutrition, and oral intake as tolerated.
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    Article: Review.
    Gastroenterology and Hepatology 07/2010; 6(7):463-4.