Article

Common Recurrent Microduplication Syndromes: Diagnosis and Management in Clinical Practice

Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A (Impact Factor: 2.05). 05/2010; 152A(5):1066-78. DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.a.33185
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Details on the phenotypic consequences of genomic microdeletions and microduplications are rapidly emerging in the wake of increased utilization of high-resolution methods for the detection of genomic copy number variants (CNVs). Due to their recent discovery, the complete phenotypic characterization of these syndromes is still in progress. For practicing clinicians, this unprecedented molecular diagnostic capability has in many cases outpaced our ability to convey conclusive information regarding these conditions to patients and family members. In particular, genomic microduplication syndromes are frequently associated with variable phenotypes and incomplete penetrance, leading to difficulty in counseling regarding the potential future consequences of a given microduplication. In this review, we have attempted to provide an initial set of recommendations for the management of patients with recurrent microduplication syndromes. We summarize the clinical information for microduplications of 14 different genomic regions and provide a framework for clinical evaluation and anticipatory guidance in these conditions. It is our expectation that these preliminary guidelines will be revised further for each microduplication syndrome as more information becomes available.

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    • "The main method for predicting the function of a gene product in the absence of experimental data is termed 'homologybased transfer' (Friedberg, 2006; Sleator & Walsh, 2010). This approach is based on the detection of significant amino acid sequence similarity to a protein(s) of known function using programmes such as BLAST (Altschul et al., 1997). "
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