Article

Interventions that involve parents to improve children's weight-related nutrition intake and activity patterns - what nutrition and activity targets and behaviour change techniques are associated with intervention

CSIRO Food and Nutritional Sciences, The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Adelaide, Australia.
Obesity Reviews (Impact Factor: 7.86). 02/2011; 12(2):114-30. DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-789X.2010.00745.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Parent involvement is an important component of obesity prevention interventions. However, the best way to support parents remains unclear. This review identifies interventions targeting parents to improve children's weight status, dietary and/or activity patterns, examines whether intervention content and behaviour change techniques employed are associated with effectiveness. Seventeen studies, in English, 1998-2008, were included. Studies were evaluated by two reviewers for study quality, nutrition/activity content and behaviour change techniques using a validated quality assessment tool and behaviour change technique taxonomy. Study findings favoured intervention effectiveness in 11 of 17 studies. Interventions that were considered effective had similar features: better study quality, parents responsible for participation and implementation, greater parental involvement and inclusion of prompt barrier identification, restructure the home environment, prompt self-monitoring, prompt specific goal setting behaviour change techniques. Energy intake/density and food choices were more likely to be targeted in effective interventions. The number of lifestyle behaviours targeted did not appear to be associated with effectiveness. Intervention effectiveness was favoured when behaviour change techniques spanned the spectrum of behaviour change process. The review provides guidance for researchers to make informed decisions on how best to utilize resources in interventions to support and engage parents, and highlights a need for improvement in intervention content reporting practices.

0 Followers
 · 
348 Views
  • Source
    • "Main type of parental involvement a Face-to-face counselling (FC) (13 studies): Anand et al. (2007); Baranowski et al. (1990); Birken et al. (2012); Haire-Joshu et al. (2008); Hakanen et al. (2006); Hendrie and Golley (2011); McGowan et al. (2013); Niinikoski et al. (2007); Rasanen et al. (2004); Sääkslahti et al. (2004); Talvia et al. (2004); Talvia et al. (2006); Wardle et al. (2003) Group education or training (G) (9 studies): Barkin et al. (2012); Beech et al. (2003); Chen et al. (2010); Fitzgibbon et al. (2013); Hu et al. (2010); Ievers-Landis et al. (2005); O'Dwyer et al. (2012); Slusser et al. (2012); Yin et al. (2012) Information sent home (I) (9 studies): De Bourdeaudhuij et al. (2002); Essery et al. (2008); Haerens et al. (2007); Haerens et al. (2006a); Haerens et al. (2006b); Hopper et al. (1992); Luepker et al. (1996); Sweitzer et al. (2010); Vandongen et al. (1995) Telephone counselling (TC) (4 studies): Centis et al. (2012); Fletcher et al. (2013); Paineau et al. (2008); Wyse et al. (2012) Study design Randomised controlled trial (RTC) (21 studies): Anand et al. (2007); Baranowski et al. (1990); Barkin et al. (2012); Beech et al. (2003); Birken et al. (2012); Centis et al. (2012); Chen et al. (2010); Essery et al. (2008); Hakanen et al. (2006); Hopper et al. (1992); Hu et al. (2010); Ievers-Landis et al. (2005); Niinikoski et al. (2007); Paineau et al. (2008); Rasanen et al. (2004); Slusser et al. (2012); Sääkslahti et al. (2004); Talvia et al. (2004); Talvia et al. (2006); Vandongen et al. (1995); Wardle et al. (2003) Cluster RCT (11 studies): Fitzgibbon et al. (2013); Fletcher et al. (2013); Haerens et al. (2007); Haerens et al. (2006a); Haerens et al. (2006b); Haire-Joshu et al. (2008); Hendrie and Golley (2011); Luepker et al. (1996); McGowan et al. (2013); O'Dwyer et al. (2012); Wyse et al. (2012) Quasi-experimental study (3 studies): De Bourdeaudhuij et al. (2002); Sweitzer et al. (2010); Yin et al. (2012) Primary study outcomes Diet (15 studies): Baranowski et al. (1990); De Bourdeaudhuij et al. (2002); Fletcher et al. (2013); Haire-Joshu et al. (2008); Hendrie and Golley (2011); Hu et al. (2010); McGowan et al. (2013); Niinikoski et al. (2007); Paineau et al. (2008); Rasanen et al. (2004); Sweitzer et al. (2010); Talvia et al. (2004); Talvia et al. (2006); Wardle et al. (2003); Wyse et al. (2012) Diet and physical activity (PA) (10 studies): Anand et al. (2007); Beech et al. (2003); Chen et al. (2010); Fitzgibbon et al. (2013); Haerens et al. (2006a); Hopper et al. (1992); Ievers-Landis et al. (2005); Luepker et al. (1996); Vandongen et al. (1995); Yin et al. (2012) PA and decreased sedentary lifestyle (5 studies): Birken et al. (2012); Essery et al. (2008); Haerens et al. (2007); O'Dwyer et al. (2012); Sääkslahti et al. (2004) Overweight/obesity (5 studies): Barkin et al. (2012); Centis et al. (2012); Haerens et al. (2006b); Hakanen et al. (2006); Slusser et al. (2012) Primary setting Home (9 studies): Anand et al. (2007); Centis et al. (2012); Essery et al. (2008); Fletcher et al. (2013); Haire-Joshu et al. (2008); McGowan et al. (2013); Paineau et al. (2008); Wardle et al. (2003); Wyse et al. (2012) School/preschool (9 studies): De Bourdeaudhuij et al. (2002); Fitzgibbon et al. (2013); Haerens et al. (2007); Haerens et al. (2006b); Hopper et al. (1992); Hu et al. (2010); Luepker et al. (1996); Sweitzer et al. (2010); Vandongen et al. (1995) Clinics/health care (10 studies): Birken et al. (2012); Hakanen et al. (2006); Hendrie and Golley (2011); Niinikoski et al. (2007); Rasanen et al. (2004); Slusser et al. (2012); Sweitzer et al. (2010); Sääkslahti et al. (2004); Talvia et al. (2004); Talvia et al. (2006) Community/other (7 studies): Baranowski et al. (1990); Barkin et al. (2012); Beech et al. (2003); Chen et al. (2010); Ievers-Landis et al. (2005); O'Dwyer et al. (2012); Yin et al. (2012) Outcome measurement Food frequency questionnaire/food recall/Record/Diary (22 studies): Anand et al. (2007); Baranowski et al. (1990); Beech et al. (2003); Chen et al. (2010); De Bourdeaudhuij et al. (2002); Essery et al. (2008); Fitzgibbon et al. (2013); Fletcher et al. (2013); Haerens et al. (2006a); Haire-Joshu et al. (2008); Hendrie and Golley (2011); Hopper et al. (1992); Hu et al. (2010); Luepker et al. (1996); McGowan et al. (2013); Niinikoski et al. (2007); Paineau et al. (2008); Rasanen et al. (2004); Talvia et al. (2004); Talvia et al. (2006); Vandongen et al. (1995); Wyse et al. (2012) Food observation (3 studies): Sweitzer et al. (2010); Wardle et al. (2003); Yin et al. (2012) Accelerometer/caltrac/pedometer (7 studies): Beech et al. (2003); Chen et al. (2010); Fitzgibbon et al. (2013); Haerens et al. (2007); Haerens et al. (2006a); O'Dwyer et al. (2012); Yin et al. (2012) PA recall/questionnaire/diary (9 studies): Anand et al. (2007); Beech et al. (2003); Essery et al. (2008); Haerens et al. (2007); Haerens et al. (2006a); Ievers-Landis et al. (2005); Luepker et al. (1996); Paineau et al. (2008); Sääkslahti et al. (2004) Screen time/sedentary time (5 studies): Anand et al. (2007); Birken et al. (2012); Essery et al. (2008); Fitzgibbon et al. (2013); O'Dwyer et al. (2012) BMI/BMI Z-score (14 studies): Anand et al. (2007); Barkin et al. (2012); Beech et al. (2003); Centis et al. (2012); Chen et al. (2010); Fitzgibbon et al. (2013); Haerens et al. (2006b); Hakanen et al. (2006); Hendrie and Golley (2011); Hu et al. (2010); Paineau et al. (2008); Slusser et al. (2012); Vandongen et al. (1995); Yin et al. (2012) Minority or low SEP groups (6 studies): Barkin et al. (2012); Fitzgibbon et al. (2013); O'Dwyer et al. (2012); Slusser et al. (2012); Talvia et al. (2004); Yin et al. (2012) Age groups targeted 2–5 years (15 studies): Barkin et al. (2012); Birken et al. (2012); Essery et al. (2008); Fitzgibbon et al. (2013); Fletcher et al. (2013); Haire-Joshu et al. (2008); Hu et al. (2010); McGowan et al. (2013); O'Dwyer et al. (2012); Slusser et al. (2012); Sweitzer et al. (2010); Sääkslahti et al. (2004); Wardle et al. (2003); Wyse et al. (2012); Yin et al. (2012) 6–11 years (10 studies): Baranowski et al. (1990); Beech et al. (2003); Centis et al. (2012); Chen et al. (2010); Hendrie and Golley (2011); Ievers-Landis et al. (2005); Luepker et al. (1996); Paineau et al. (2008); Rasanen et al. (2004); Vandongen et al. (1995) 12–18 years (5 studies): De Bourdeaudhuij et al. (2002); Haerens et al. (2007); Haerens et al. (2006a); Haerens et al. (2006b); Hopper et al. (1992) Mixed age groups (5 studies): Anand et al. (2007); Hakanen et al. (2006); Niinikoski et al. (2007); Talvia et al. (2004); Talvia et al. (2006) a Some studies used more than one type of involvement but here the grouping is done according to the main type. Table 2 Main outcomes, study design, setting, participants, intervention content and summary of results of included studies. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The evidence regarding effectiveness of parental support interventions targeting children's health behaviours is weak. We aimed to review: 1) Effectiveness of universal parental support interventions to promote dietary habits, physical activity (PA) or prevent overweight and obesity among children 2-18 years and 2) effectiveness in relation to family socio-economic position. Thirty five studies from 1990-2013 were identified from major databases. Quality was assessed by four criteria accounting for selection and attrition bias, fidelity to intervention, and outcome measurement methodology, categorizing studies as strong, moderate or weak. Four interventions types were identified: Face-to-face counselling, group education, information sent home, and telephone counselling. Face-to-face or telephone counselling was effective in changing children's diet, while there was only weak evidence for improvement in PA. Sending home information was not effective. Concerning body weight, group education seemed more promising than counselling. Intervention effectiveness was generally higher in younger compared to older children. In groups with low socio-economic position, group-based approaches appeared promising. In the future efforts should be made to improve reporting of intervention content, include a power calculation for the main outcome, use of high quality outcome assessment methodology, and a follow-up period of at least 6 months. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    Preventive Medicine 05/2015; 77. DOI:10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.05.005 · 2.93 Impact Factor
  • Source
    • "Although the number of studies that could be included in the present review was small, it appears that studies including more strategies in the parental intervention component and focusing on more home-related factors are more likely to be effective. The systematic review of Golley et al. (2010) examined whether intervention content and behaviour change techniques employed in familybased interventions are associated with intervention effectiveness . They found that the variety of strategies included in a family-based intervention influences study effectiveness . "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Parental involvement is often advocated as important for school-based interventions, however, to date, only inconsistent evidence is available. Therefore, this study aimed at determining the impact of parental involvement in school-based obesity prevention interventions in children and adolescents. A systematic review of obesity prevention studies published from 1990 to 2010 including a comparison between school-based interventions with and without parental component was conducted. Only studies reporting effects on health behaviour-related outcomes were included. Some positive effects of parental involvement were found on children's behaviours and behavioural determinants. Parental modules including different strategies and addressing several home-related determinants and parenting practices concerning eating and physical activity behaviours were more likely to be effective. However, no conclusive evidence could be provided concerning the added value of parent involvement, because of the paucity of studies to test this hypothesis. The few studies that are available provide inconsistent evidence. There is a need for more studies comparing school-based interventions with and without a parental component, and dose, strategies and content of parental components of school-based interventions should be better reported in articles.
    International Journal of Public Health 02/2012; 57(4):673-8. DOI:10.1007/s00038-012-0335-3 · 2.70 Impact Factor
  • Source
    • "A detailed description of the systematic search strategy was published elsewhere (Golley et al., 2011). A brief description is provided below. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This review identifies studies describing interventions delivered across both the home and school/community setting, which target obesity and weight-related nutrition and physical activity behaviors in children. Fifteen studies, published between 1998 and 2010, were included and evaluated for effectiveness, study quality, nutrition/activity content, behavior change techniques, and theoretical basis, using validated assessment tools/taxonomies. Seven studies were rated as effective. Behavior change techniques used to engage families, and techniques associated with intervention effectiveness were coded. Effective studies used about 10 behavior change techniques, compared with 6.5 in ineffective studies. Effective interventions used techniques including providing general information on behavior-health links, prompting practice of behavior, and planning for social support/social changes. Different behavior change techniques were applied in the home and school setting. The findings of this review provide novel insights into the techniques associated with intervention effectiveness that can inform the development of public health obesity prevention strategies.
    Health Education &amp Behavior 10/2011; 39(2):159-71. DOI:10.1177/1090198111420286 · 1.54 Impact Factor
Show more