Article

TRP Channel Regulates EGFR Signaling in Hair Morphogenesis and Skin Barrier Formation

The Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, the University of Michigan, 3089 Natural Science Building (Kraus), 830 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
Cell (Impact Factor: 33.12). 04/2010; 141(2):331-43. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2010.03.013
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT A plethora of growth factors regulate keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation that control hair morphogenesis and skin barrier formation. Wavy hair phenotypes in mice result from naturally occurring loss-of-function mutations in the genes for TGF-alpha and EGFR. Conversely, excessive activities of TGF-alpha/EGFR result in hairless phenotypes and skin cancers. Unexpectedly, we found that mice lacking the Trpv3 gene also exhibit wavy hair coat and curly whiskers. Here we show that keratinocyte TRPV3, a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of Ca(2+)-permeant channels, forms a signaling complex with TGF-alpha/EGFR. Activation of EGFR leads to increased TRPV3 channel activity, which in turn stimulates TGF-alpha release. TRPV3 is also required for the formation of the skin barrier by regulating the activities of transglutaminases, a family of Ca(2+)-dependent crosslinking enzymes essential for keratinocyte cornification. Our results show that a TRP channel plays a role in regulating growth factor signaling by direct complex formation.

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