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Role of antioxidants in the skin: Anti-aging effects

Nikkol Group Cosmos Technical Center Co., Ltd., 3-24-3 Hasune, Itabashi-Ku, Tokyo 174-0046, Japan.
Journal of dermatological science (Impact Factor: 3.34). 05/2010; 58(2):85-90. DOI: 10.1016/j.jdermsci.2010.03.003
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Intracellular and extracellular oxidative stress initiated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) advance skin aging, which is characterized by wrinkles and atypical pigmentation. Because UV enhances ROS generation in cells, skin aging is usually discussed in relation to UV exposure. The use of antioxidants is an effective approach to prevent symptoms related to photo-induced aging of the skin. In this review, the mechanisms of ROS generation and ROS elimination in the body are summarized. The effects of ROS generated in the skin and the roles of ROS in altering the skin are also discussed. In addition, the effects of representative antioxidants on the skin are summarized with a focus on skin aging.

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