Article

Comparing fludeoxyglucose F18-PET assessment of regional cerebral glucose metabolism and [11C]dihydrotetrabenazine-PET in evaluation of early dementia and mild cognitive impairment.

VA Ann Arbor Health System Geriatrics Research, Education, and Clinical Center, and Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200, USA.
Archives of neurology (Impact Factor: 7.01). 04/2010; 67(4):440-6. DOI: 10.1001/archneurol.2010.34
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To compare assessment of regional cerebral metabolic changes with [(11)C]dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ)-positron emission tomography (PET) measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (K(1)) and fludeoxyglucose F18 (FDG)-PET measurement of regional cerebral glucose uptake (CMR(glc)) in a clinically representative sample of subjects with mild dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI).
[(11)C]Dihydrotetrabenazine-PET K(1) and FDG-PET CMR(glc) measurements were performed.
University-based cognitive disorders clinic.
Fifty subjects with either mild dementia (Mini-Mental State Examination score > or = 18) or MCI. Their results were compared with those of 80 normal control subjects.
The DTBZ-PET regional K(1) and FDG-PET CMR(glc) measurements were compared with standard correlation analysis. The overall patterns of DTBZ-PET K(1) and FDG-PET CMR(glc) deficits were assessed with stereotaxic surface projections (SSPs) of parametric images.
The DTBZ-PET regional K(1) and FDG-PET CMR(glc) measurements were highly correlated, both within and between subjects. The SSP maps of deficits in DTBZ-PET regional K(1) and FDG-PET CMR(glc) measurements were markedly similar. The DTBZ-PET K(1) SSP maps exhibited a mild decrease in sensitivity relative to FDG-PET CMR(glc) maps.
Both DTBZ-PET K(1) and FDG-PET CMR(glc) measurements provide comparable information in assessment of regional cerebral metabolic deficits in mild dementia and MCI. Blood flow measures can assess regional cerebral metabolism deficits accurately in mild dementia and MCI. Blood flow assessments of regional cerebral metabolic deficits can be combined with tracer binding results to improve utility of PET imaging in mild dementia and MCI.

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Available from: James F Burke, Nov 07, 2014
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