Article

Cucurbitane-Type Triterpenoids from Momordica charantia

Office of Regulatory Science, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U. S. Food and Drug Administration, College Park, MD 20740, USA.
Planta Medica (Impact Factor: 2.34). 04/2010; 76(15):1758-61. DOI: 10.1055/s-0030-1249807
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT One new cucurbitane-type triterpenoid glycoside, momordicoside U (1), together with five known cucurbitane-type triterpenoids and related glycosides, 3β,7 β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23 (E)-dien-19-al (2), momordicine I (3), momordicine II (4), 3-hydroxycucurbita-5,24-dien-19-al-7,23-di-O-β-glucopyranoside (5), and kuguaglycoside G (6), were isolated from the whole plant of Momordica charantia. Their structures were determined by chemical and spectroscopic methods. Momordicoside U (1) was evaluated for insulin secretion activity in an in vitro insulin secretion assay and displayed moderate activity.

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