Article

Region-based diagnostic performance of multidetector CT for detecting peritoneal seeding in ovarian cancer patients.

Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, Ulsan, Korea.
Archives of Gynecology (Impact Factor: 1.28). 04/2010; 283(2):353-60. DOI: 10.1007/s00404-010-1442-0
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To determine the accuracy of multi-detector CT (MDCT) compared with the surgical findings, such as peritoneal seeding and metastatic lymph nodes, in ovarian cancer patients.
Fifty-seven FIGO stage IA-IV ovarian cancer patients, who underwent MDCT before primary surgery, were included in this study. Two radiologists evaluated the following imaging findings in consensus: the presence of nodular, plaque-like or infiltrative soft-tissue lesions in peritoneal fat or on the serosal surface; presence of ascites; parietal peritoneal thickening or enhancement; and small bowel wall thickening or distortion. We also evaluated the presence of lymph node metastases. To allow region-specific comparisons, the peritoneal cavity was divided into 13 regions and retroperitoneal lymph nodes were divided into 3 regions. Descriptive statistical data were thus obtained.
The MDCT sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values were 45, 72, 46, and 72%, respectively, for detecting peritoneal seeding and 21, 90, 52, and 69%, respectively, for detecting lymph node metastasis.
MDCT is moderately accurate for detecting peritoneal metastasis and lymph node metastasis in ovarian cancer patients.

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