Article

Learning disabilities and anxiety: a meta-analysis.

University of Georgia, Regents' Center for Learning Disorders, Athens, GA 30602, USA.
Journal of learning disabilities (Impact Factor: 1.77). 04/2010; 44(1):3-17. DOI: 10.1177/0022219409359939
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This article presents the results of a meta-analysis of the empirical literature on anxious symptomatology among school-aged students with learning disabilities (LD) in comparison to their non-LD peers. Fifty-eight studies met inclusion criteria. Results indicate that students with LD had higher mean scores on measures of anxiety than did non-LD students. The overall effect size was statistically significant and medium in magnitude (d=.61) although substantial heterogeneity of results was found. Moderator effects were examined for informant type, gender, grade, publication status, and identification source. Informant type (i.e., self-, parent, or teacher report) explained a significant amount of variability in the sample of studies, and identification source (i.e., school identified or special school and clinic/hospital identified) approached statistical significance. Implications for assessment and intervention are discussed.

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