Article

The use of complementary and alternative fertility treatment in couples seeking fertility care: data from a prospective cohort in the United States

Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143-1695, USA.
Fertility and sterility (Impact Factor: 4.3). 03/2010; 93(7):2169-74. DOI: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2010.02.054
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To determine the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among couples seeking fertility care and to identify the predictors of CAM use in this population.
Prospective cohort study.
Eight community and academic infertility practices.
A total of 428 couples presenting for an infertility evaluation.
Interviews and questionnaires.
Prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine therapy.
After 18 months of observation, 29% of the couples had utilized a CAM modality for treatment of infertility; 22% had tried acupuncture, 17% herbal therapy, 5% a form of body work, and 1% meditation. An annual household income of > or = $200,000 (odds ratio 2.8, relative to couples earning <$100,000), not achieving a pregnancy (odds ratio 2.3), and a positive attitude toward CAM use at baseline were independently associated with CAM use.
A substantial minority of infertile couples use CAM treatments. CAM was chosen most commonly by wealthier couples, those not achieving a pregnancy, and those with a baseline belief in the effectiveness of CAM treatments.

3 Followers
 · 
146 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Patients undergoing IVF may receive either acupuncture or whole-systems traditional Chinese medicine (WS-TCM) as an adjuvant IVF treatment. WS-TCM is a complex intervention that can include acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, dietary, lifestyle recommendations. In this retrospective cohort study, 1231 IVF patient records were reviewed to assess the effect of adjuvant WS-TCM on IVF outcomes compared among three groups: IVF with no additional treatment; IVF and elective acupuncture on day of embryo transfer; or IVF and elective WS-TCM. The primary outcome was live birth. Of 1069 non-donor cycles, WS-TCM was associated with greater odds of live birth compared with IVF alone (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.09; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36 to 3.21), or embryo transfer with acupuncture only (AOR 1.62; 95% CI 1.04 to 2.52). Of 162 donor cycles, WS-TCM was associated with increased live births compared with all groups (odds Ratio [OR] 3.72; 95% CI 1.05 to 13.24, unadjusted) or embryo transfer with acupuncture only (OR 4.09; 95% CI: 1.02 to 16.38, unadjusted). Overall, IVF with adjuvant WS-TCM was associated with greater odds of live birth in donor and non-donor cycles. These results should be taken cautiously as more rigorous research is needed. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Reproductive biomedicine online 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.rbmo.2015.02.005 · 2.98 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To assess the effect of Traditional Chinese Herbal Medicine (CHM) in the management of female infertility and on pregnancy rates compared with Western Medical (WM) treatment and update previous meta-analyses.
    Complementary Therapies in Medicine 01/2015; 23(1). DOI:10.1016/j.ctim.2014.12.004 · 2.22 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Infertility patients are increasingly using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to supplement or replace conventional fertility treatments. The objective of this study was to determine the roles of CAM practitioners in the support and treatment of infertility.
    BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 10/2014; 14(1):394. DOI:10.1186/1472-6882-14-394 · 1.88 Impact Factor

Full-text (3 Sources)

Download
31 Downloads
Available from
Jun 7, 2014